A new book by the prominent neurologist Oliver Sacks is always cause for excitement, and THE MIND’S EYE (Knopf, $26.95), his new collection of six stories about patients with neurologically-based vision problems, has two added pleasures: an update on the continuing visual impairments suffered by the eponymous patient of The Man Who Mistook His  Wife For A Hat, and the inclusion of two deeply personal essays about Dr. Sacks’s own case.  In “Face-Blind,” Sacks recounts his lifelong inability to recognize or recollect faces and places and his coping mechanisms for adapting to and compensating for this visual deficit.  In another piece he writes about feeling like a terrified child when a melanoma is diagnosed in his eye. 

The Mind's Eye Cover Image
$16.00
ISBN: 9780307473028
Availability: Backordered
Published: Vintage - October 4th, 2011

Many animals, insects, and birds are described as social, but their colonies, hives, and flocks can’t be said to have a culture. Similarly, while animals are credited with intelligence and emotion, they’re not believed to have the “autobiographical self” that humans do. In his latest exploration of the unique qualities of the human brain, the neuroscientist Antonio Damasio, author of Looking for Spinoza and Descartes’ Error, again combines science and philosophy to uncover the deepest secrets of what makes us human. SELF COMES TO MIND (Pantheon, $28.95) considers the continuum of brain and mind, consciousness and self; where is that elusive point at which a mass of cells yields abstract ideas, or where sensory awareness gives rise to a sense of one’s self as an autonomous being? If the answers remain elusive, the search for consciousness as a biological and evolutionary process is fascinating.

Self Comes to Mind: Constructing the Conscious Brain Cover Image
$17.00
ISBN: 9780307474957
Availability: Not On Our Shelves—Ships in 1-5 Days
Published: Vintage - March 6th, 2012