Staff Pick

“SLUGGO IS LIT!” With these words Olivia Jaimes's Nancy: A Comic Collection (Andrews McMeel, $14.99) fully transcended its origins as a 1930s comic strip and became something even more horrifying: a meme. Ernie Bushmiller's original run is beloved by comics fans for its creative gags and sense of economy. The mysterious Jaimes (a pseudonym) doesn't so much reinvent the wheel with her take on the character as wrest the original from the clutches of Bushmiller's mediocre successors. Once more, Nancy is headstrong, greedy, and self-obsessed—and she’s all the better for it. But now she and her friend Sluggo have smartphones, Fritzi is devoted to the Marie Kondo ethos, and a new but already long-suffering teacher at school has started a robotics club. There are jokes about the difference between liking somebody's post and commenting and sharing on somebody's post on social media; there are jokes about badly drawn strips being the result of Snapchat filters; there are jokes that don't so much smash open the fourth wall as remap it. The result is a strong collection of distinctly modern comic strips that remain wholly in keeping with the anarchic original. The volume also includes essays and interviews for die-hard Nancyphiles.

Nancy: A Comic Collection Cover Image
$14.99
ISBN: 9781524853259
Availability: In Stock—Click for Locations
Published: Andrews McMeel Publishing - October 1st, 2019

Staff Pick

So you're a fan of “Mister” Fred Rogers and his classic TV series, Mr. Rogers' Neighborhood. You've read Maxwell King's Rogers biography The Good Neighbor. You saw the documentary Won't You Be My Neighbor and likely have already bought your tickets to the reportedly very good film A Beautiful Day in the Neighborhood, starring Tom Hanks. Maybe you've even read every profile on the man available on the AV Club, and scoured the internet for interviews, analyses, and clips. What do you do now? Or even worse: what if you are trying to buy a gift for the Mr. Rogers fan who has everything? What then? Well, why not a coffee table book that features a photo breakdown of every single one of Fred Rogers' ties? Why not a coffee table book that features input from luminaries like Melissa Wagner, who has collaborated with Rogers himself on books in the past, and Tim Lybarger, creator of the Rogers fansite The Neighborhood Archive? That is, Mister Rogers' Neighborhood: A Visual History (Clarkson Potter, $35), a massive compendium of interviews, photos, and behind-the-scenes information. A worthy gift for those starving for kindness in these dark times, and a monument to a historic television production.

Mister Rogers' Neighborhood: A Visual History Cover Image
$35.00
ISBN: 9781984826213
Availability: In Stock—Click for Locations
Published: Clarkson Potter - October 29th, 2019

Staff Pick

 Light is a novel about three individuals slowly calcifying into crushing, existential pain and meaninglessness. Their only hope is an unknown force that lurks in the wild of the Kefahuchi Tract, a reality-defying and endlessly pillaged reliquary in space home to the detritus of a trillion exhausted civilizations. A change that obliterates: but also one that saves? Light is SF as existentialism, and while sometimes indulgent, I'd count it among one of my favorite books.

 

 

 

 
Light: A Novel (Kefahuchi Tract #1) Cover Image
$18.00
ISBN: 9780553382952
Availability: In Stock—Click for Locations
Published: Spectra - August 31st, 2004

Pages