YELLOW HOUSE, by Broom NOTE: Meeting Online

Daytime
Wednesday, March 17, 12:30 pm

he Daytime Book Group meets 3rd Wednesday of each month at 12:30 p.m. and reads mostly fiction new and old, and some nonfiction. The book group is now meeting online--for details please contact Jeanie Teare jwteare4@gmail.com

The Yellow House: A Memoir (2019 National Book Award Winner) By Sarah M. Broom Cover Image

The Yellow House: A Memoir (2019 National Book Award Winner) (Paperback)

$17.00


In Stock—Click for Locations
Politics and Prose at 5015 Connecticut Avenue NW
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Politics and Prose at 70 District Square SW
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Politics and Prose at Union Market
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A NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER

Winner of the 2019 National Book Award in Nonfiction

A brilliant, haunting and unforgettable memoir from a stunning new talent about the inexorable pull of home and family, set in a shotgun house in New Orleans East.

In 1961, Sarah M. Broom's mother Ivory Mae bought a shotgun house in the then-promising neighborhood of New Orleans East and built her world inside of it. It was the height of the Space Race and the neighborhood was home to a major NASA plant--the postwar optimism seemed assured. Widowed, Ivory Mae remarried Sarah's father Simon Broom; their combined family would eventually number twelve children. But after Simon died, six months after Sarah's birth, the Yellow House would become Ivory Mae's thirteenth and most unruly child.

A book of great ambition, Sarah M. Broom's The Yellow House tells a hundred years of her family and their relationship to home in a neglected area of one of America's most mythologized cities. This is the story of a mother's struggle against a house's entropy, and that of a prodigal daughter who left home only to reckon with the pull that home exerts, even after the Yellow House was wiped off the map after Hurricane Katrina. The Yellow House expands the map of New Orleans to include the stories of its lesser known natives, guided deftly by one of its native daughters, to demonstrate how enduring drives of clan, pride, and familial love resist and defy erasure. Located in the gap between the "Big Easy" of tourist guides and the New Orleans in which Broom was raised, The Yellow House is a brilliant memoir of place, class, race, the seeping rot of inequality, and the internalized shame that often follows. It is a transformative, deeply moving story from an unparalleled new voice of startling clarity, authority, and power.

Sarah M. Broom is a writer whose work has appeared in the New Yorker, The New York Times Magazine, The Oxford American, and O, The Oprah Magazine among others. A native New Orleanian, she received her Masters in Journalism from the University of California, Berkeley in 2004. She was awarded a Whiting Foundation Creative Nonfiction Grant in 2016 and was a finalist for the New York Foundation for the Arts Fellowship in Creative Nonfiction in 2011. She has also been awarded fellowships at Djerassi Resident Artists Program and The MacDowell Colony. She lives in New York state.
Product Details ISBN: 9780802149039
ISBN-10: 0802149030
Publisher: Grove Press
Publication Date: June 30th, 2020
Pages: 400
Language: English


THE HAUNTED BOOKSHOP, by Morley NOTE: Meeting Online

Daytime
Wednesday, February 17, 12:30 pm

The Daytime Book Group meets 3rd Wednesday of each month at 12:30 p.m. and reads mostly fiction new and old, and some nonfiction. The book group is now meeting online--for details please contact Jeanie Teare jwteare4@gmail.com

Christopher Morley: Two Classic Novels in One Volume: Parnassus on Wheels and the Haunted Bookshop By Christopher Morley Cover Image

Christopher Morley: Two Classic Novels in One Volume: Parnassus on Wheels and the Haunted Bookshop (Paperback)

$14.95


In Stock—Click for Locations
(This book cannot be returned.)
Politics and Prose at 5015 Connecticut Avenue NW
2 on hand, as of Dec 2 1:19pm
This single-volume edition of both of Christopher Morley's most popular novels will charm all lovers of books about books. In the first story, Parnassus on Wheels, 39-year-old Helen McGill is weary of keeping house for her bachelor brother. When red-bearded bookseller Roger Mifflin rolls into town, she impulsively purchases his mobile bookshop. Roger promises to teach Helen the trade before retiring to write his long-overdue book, and together they hit the road for a series of winsome adventures throughout New England. Their story was praised by Boston's Evening Transcript as graceful in style ... and] entertaining in every aspect.
Roger Mifflin returns in The Haunted Bookshop, which unfolds in his Brooklyn store, the Parnassus at Home. The spirits of great literature haunt the shop, providing an atmospheric background for the tale of a young ad man, Aubrey Gilbert, who's smitten with Roger's comely assistant, Titania. When Aubrey notices a suspicious-looking character skulking in a nearby alleyway and is attacked on his way home, the ardent suitor fears for Titania's safety and turns amateur detective. Part mystery, part spy thriller, and part romance, the humorous tale is a complete delight.
Christopher Morley (1890-1957) wrote more than 100 books, including novels, essays, and poetry. A Rhodes Scholar, he began his literary career at Doubleday and was one of the first judges of the Book of the Month Club. Morley was a founder and longtime contributor to the Saturday Review of Literature, and his enthusiasm for Sherlock Holmes stories led to his role in helping found the Baker Street Irregulars.
Product Details ISBN: 9780486817309
ISBN-10: 048681730X
Publisher: Dover Publications
Publication Date: January 16th, 2018
Pages: 304
Language: English


A DIFFERENT DRUMMER, by Kelley NOTE: Meeting Online the fourth Wednesday for this month.

Daytime
Wednesday, January 27, 12:30 pm

The Daytime Book Group meets 3rd Wednesday of each month at 12:30 p.m. and reads mostly fiction new and old, and some nonfiction.The book group is now meeting online--for details please contact Jeanie Teare jwteare4@gmail.com

A Different Drummer By William Melvin Kelley Cover Image

A Different Drummer (Paperback)

$16.00


In Stock—Click for Locations
Politics and Prose at 5015 Connecticut Avenue NW
1 on hand, as of Dec 2 1:19pm
The stunning, thought-provoking first novel by a "lost giant of American literature" (The New Yorker)

June, 1957. One hot afternoon in the backwaters of the Deep South, a young black farmer named Tucker Caliban salts his fields, shoots his horse, burns his house, and heads north with his wife and child. His departure sets off an exodus of the state’s entire black population, throwing the established order into brilliant disarray. Told from the points of view of the white residents who remained, A Different Drummer stands, decades after its first publication in 1962, as an extraordinary and prescient triumph of satire and spirit.
William Melvin Kelley was born in New York City in 1937 and attended the Fieldston School and Harvard. The author of four novels and a short story collection, he was a writer in residence at the State University of New York at Geneseo and also taught at the New School and Sarah Lawrence College. He was awarded the Anisfield-Wolf Book Award for lifetime achievement and the Dana Reed Prize for creative writing. He died in 2017.
Product Details ISBN: 9780385413909
ISBN-10: 0385413904
Publisher: Anchor
Publication Date: May 1st, 1990
Pages: 224
Language: English
“[A] lost giant of American literature. . . . Brilliant.” —The New Yorker

"A work of deep originality and superior craftsmanship whose treatment of racial politics resists ideological classification. . . . A potent brew of mythology, gossip, history, political argument and family drama. . . . A Different Drummer is animated by a force so immense, and fed by so much history, that it transcends encapsulation." —The Wall Street Journal

“This fierce and brilliant novel is written with sympathy as well as sorrow. It’s a myth packed with real-world resonance.” —The Guardian
 
“Radical and important.” —Financial Times
 
“Kelley blended fantasy and fact to construct an alternative world whose sweep and complexity drew comparisons to James Joyce and William Faulkner.” —The New York Times
 
“A rare first novel; dynamic, imaginative, and accomplished.” —Chicago Sunday Tribune

“Powerful. . . . Unflinching. . . . A gift to literature.” —The Observer

“So brilliant is this initial novel that one must consider Mr. Kelley for tentative future placement among the paragons of American letters.” —Boston Sunday Herald

“Beautifully written and thought-provoking.” —Baltimore Evening Sun

“This first novel just perhaps could play a part in changing our history.” —Kansas City Star

“An astounding achievement . . . Timeless, mythic. . . . Still relevant and powerful today.” —The Sunday Times (London)

“Breathtakingly good. . . . Must be one of the most assured debuts of all time.” —Sjón, author of CoDex 1962

“An imaginative, brilliantly observed world of the 20th-century Deep South in turmoil. . . . Kelley delivers his observations with caustic humour and surprising compassion. The comparisons of his debut to the books of James Baldwin and Faulkner are justified.” —The Irish Times

“A rediscovered classic of African American literature. . . . A powerful novel that weaves intricate themes like racism, systemized oppression and identity together.” —Bookriot



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