Those readers who prefer Emily Brontë’s gloriously dramatic and lush novel Wuthering Heights to sister Charlotte’s literary offerings are in for a treat with The Annotated Wuthering Heights (Belknap, $35), edited by Janet Gezari, English literature professor at Connecticut College. This handsome wide-margined volume is filled with art that helps recreate Heathcliff and Catherine’s world of Yorkshire at the turn of 19th century, as well as Gezari’s plentiful notes to help contextualize Brontë’s imagery and allusions. Peppered throughout are facsimiles of pages taken from Brontë’s poems and diary, which is a particular treat, and modern illustrations of the novel’s scenes. Altogether, these realize a bibliophile’s dream edition of this classic, and the perfect gift for Brontë devotees.
The Annotated Wuthering Heights Cover Image
By Emily Bronte, Janet Gezari (Editor)
$35.00
ISBN: 9780674724693
Availability: Not On Our Shelves—Ships in 1-5 Days
Published: Belknap Press - October 20th, 2014

When Sarah Waters came to Politics and Prose, she described her new book as “a love story with a crime.” Set between the wars in London, The Paying Guests (Riverhead, $28.95) tells the story of Frances, a spinster of twenty-seven, who lives with her mother in a large, decaying house. With all the men gone, the women are forced to take in lodgers to pay for their home’s upkeep. The intrigue starts when Frances falls in love with one of the lodgers. In typical Waters fashion, what follows is a gripping tale of sex, passion, and murder. Waters is a meticulous writer, delicately and deftly able to capture a time period, mood, or even a mundane task and make it come alive. She always takes readers on a rollercoaster ride, and, as with her previous books, which include Fingersmith and The Night Watch, you may find yourself turning pages well past your bedtime.
The Paying Guests Cover Image
ISBN: 9781594633119
Availability: Hard to Find
Published: Riverhead Books - September 16th, 2014

This fever-dream of a novel starts in mid-sentence, as if there’s been no break between the last appearance of Dr. Zack Busner in Umbrella and the return of this unconventional psychiatrist in Shark (Grove, $26). But it’s 1975 now, everyone is watching Jaws, and the doctor has established a half-way house. In his powerful, Joycean stream of monologues, hallucinations, and impressions, Will Self asks how sane people respond to an insane event. His tenth novel examines three such episodes, tracing the impact of the Hiroshima bombing, the 1945 wreck of the U.S.S. Indianapolis (torpedoed by the Japanese, the ship sank in twelve minutes, wasn’t missed for four days, and had 316 survivors out of 1,196 men), and, on the domestic front, one woman’s battered childhood at the hands of alcoholic parents. Self intertwines these and other narratives, making the point that an individual’s trauma also belongs to the culture as a whole; you can be haunted by the atomic blast’s “skin angels” without having been a target spotter on the Enola Gay. Bleak as this vision is, however, Self presents it with such manic wordplay and startling humor that readers could almost laugh right through “the snafu at the end of the world.”

Shark Cover Image
ISBN: 9780802123107
Availability: Out of Print in This Format
Published: Grove Press - November 4th, 2014

Shark Cover Image
$16.00
ISBN: 9780802124173
Availability: Special Order—Subject to Availability
Published: Grove Press - October 13th, 2015

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