It may be 2013, but the capacious 19th-century novel is alive and kicking. Eleanor Catton’s Man Booker-winning The Luminaries (Little, Brown, $27), with its homage to masters like Dickens and Wilkie Collins, its elaborate weave of literary artifice, and its ingenious lunar and astrological structure—as if Catton is casting a star chart for this narrative as much as inventing a story in which fortune plays a leading role—is also a self-consciously post-modern literary work, though one infused with the ebullience of a storyteller rather than the arch irony of an experimental writer. Set in the New Zealand gold rush town of Hokitika in 1866, this is the kind of rangy page-turner you can dive into and stay submerged in for hours and hundreds of pages at a stretch. The landscape is vivid, the language rich, the voices earthy and theatrical, and the plot is an endlessly unfolding fabric of tales, confessions, dreams, lies, mysteries, and more. With its hermits and whores, preachers and politicians, Maoris and miners, this novel truly is, as the Man Booker judges said, a “dazzling work, luminous, vast.”

The Luminaries: A Novel Cover Image
ISBN: 9780316074315
Availability: Hard to Find
Published: Little, Brown and Company - October 15th, 2013

The Luminaries Cover Image
$18.00
ISBN: 9780316074292
Availability: In Stock—Click for Locations
Published: Back Bay Books - October 7th, 2014

 

It’s a question that has tugged at mystery fans, authors, and scholars alike: why, after a long day, do we enjoy sitting down to read a good murder mystery? In fact, it’s elementary. The short answer to what happened in Victorian culture that made murder the number-one form of entertainment, brought about the police force as we know it now, and created one of literature’s most recognizable characters, was—Sherlock Holmes, consulting detective. In her compulsively readable history of The Invention of Murder (Thomas Dunne, $26.99), Judith Flanders recounts the true exploits of Scotland Yard and the oddest murders of the nineteenth century, spinning a yarn as entertaining as any by Agatha Christie.

The Invention of Murder: How the Victorians Revelled in Death and Detection and Created Modern Crime Cover Image
ISBN: 9781250024879
Availability: Hard to Find
Published: Thomas Dunne Books - July 23rd, 2013

The Invention of Murder: How the Victorians Revelled in Death and Detection and Created Modern Crime Cover Image
$18.99
ISBN: 9781250048530
Availability: In Stock—Click for Locations
Published: St. Martin's Griffin - July 15th, 2014

 

In Days of Fire: Bush and Cheney in the White House (Doubleday, $35), Peter Baker goes beyond the previous wave of books about the Bush administration, delivering the most comprehensive and authoritative account so far of the Bush years. Writing with characteristic balance and insight, Baker, senior White House correspondent for The New York Times, offers fresh perspective on the complicated Bush-Cheney relationship and many other aspects of that controversial period. The book manages not only to pull together in one clear narrative the wealth of information available from public sources, but also draws on many revealing quotes and anecdotes from interviews and documents not previously published.

Days of Fire: Bush and Cheney in the White House Cover Image
$35.00
ISBN: 9780385525183
Availability: Special Order—Subject to Availability
Published: Doubleday Books - October 22nd, 2013

Days of Fire: Bush and Cheney in the White House Cover Image
$17.95
ISBN: 9780385525190
Availability: In Stock—Click for Locations
Published: Anchor - June 3rd, 2014

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