This Beautiful Life - Helen Schulman

It’s every parent’s nightmare: one impulsive move by an otherwise good kid—in this case the forwarding of a sexually explicit video—throws a family into crisis and exposes every fault line in a marriage. In This Beautiful Life (Harper Perennial, $13.99), Helen Schulman takes a ripped-from-theheadlines plot and renders it into a finely crafted and nuanced narrative of a family disassembling under pressure. Although the author depicts a world of privilege in which children have slumber parties at the Plaza Hotel and where diversity at the elite Manhattan private school they attend consists of “millionaires…and…billionaires,” the stressful details and the high stakes of parenting will ring true to anyone who has ever spent a sleepless night worrying about her teen.
This Beautiful Life: A Novel Cover Image
$15.99
ISBN: 9780062024398
Availability: Not On Our Shelves—Ships in 1-5 Days
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Published: Harper Perennial - February 7th, 2012

Three Stages of Amazement - Carol Edgarian

Crashing financial markets and the Bernie Madoff Ponzi scheme serve as the backdrop to Carol Edgarian’s Three Stages of Amazement (Scribner, $16)—and also as a mirror for one family’s own series of small implosions. “Cerebral Palsy was a term sometimes used” to describe the condition of Lena Rusch and Charlie Pepper’s ailing elevenmonth old, and her care has become all-consuming. Meanwhile, Charlie’s tech company is faltering and the potential financial fix comes with moral complications. This glimpse of a wealthy San Francisco family in crisis is convincing and finely wrought. While the novel is not a comedy, a scene involving black lingerie and a cell phone in a tree is possibly one of the funniest set-ups in this season’s crop of fiction.
Three Stages of Amazement: A Novel Cover Image
$19.99
ISBN: 9781439198315
Availability: Special Order—Subject to Availability
Published: Scribner - February 7th, 2012

The Arrogant Years - Lucette Lagnado

Lucette Lagnado’s 2007 memoir, The Man in the White Sharkskin Suit, was a narrative of her family’s wrenching exile from Nasser’s anti-Semitic 1960s Cairo, filtered through the lens of her dashing, charismatic father. Lagnado’s second memoir, The Arrogant Years (Ecco, $14.99), covers similar terrain, but from the point of view of her mother, who was something of a footnote in the first volume. This is a poignant story of immigrant Brooklyn, of summers at Brighton Beach, Ocean Parkway synagogues, and of the longing to belong. Vignettes about the author’s attempt to find a kosher meal at Vassar, and of her mother’s fierce embrace of her job as a clerk at the Brooklyn Public Library, give this book a rich emotional texture.

Lucette Lagnado’s 2007 memoir, The Man in the White Sharkskin Suit, was a narrative of her family’s wrenching exile from Nasser’s increasingly anti-Semitic 1960s Cairo, filtered through the lens of her dashing, charismatic father. Her extraordinary gift for storytelling left the reader with an almost proprietary attachment to the characters, particularly to her long-suffering mother, who was something of a footnote in that book. Lagnado’s new memoir, The Arrogant Years (Ecco, $25.99), fills in those gaps and much more, with a rich, vivid portrait of immigrant life in Brooklyn and of the author’s own excruciating coming-of-age, which included battling cancer.

The Arrogant Years: One Girl's Search for Her Lost Youth, from Cairo to Brooklyn Cover Image
$16.99
ISBN: 9780061803697
Availability: Not On Our Shelves—Ships in 1-5 Days
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Published: Ecco - April 17th, 2012

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