Staff Pick

Winner of the 2016 Pulitzer for criticism, Emily Nussbaum writes about TV like the art that it is. Gathered from some fifteen years of work for The New Yorker, New York, and other publications—along with several new pieces—the essays in I Like to Watch (Random House, $28) wholeheartedly celebrate television and guide us to new ways of looking at it. Arguing that TV demands more than just watching, Nussbaum outlines her struggle with “prestige television”—an awakening she traces to Buffy the Vampire Slayer—and questions the breakdown of shows into high and low-brow. She also examines programming in the light of #MeToo, explores how fans distort their favorite shows, profiles influential figures such as Kenya Barris, Jenji Kohan, and Ryan Murphy, assesses the legacies of Norman Lear and Joan Rivers, and more.

I Like to Watch: Arguing My Way Through the TV Revolution Cover Image
$28.00
ISBN: 9780525508960
Availability: In Stock—Click for Locations
Published: Random House - June 25th, 2019

Staff Pick

Toni Tipton-Martin, a culinary journalist and founding member of the Southern Foodways Alliance and Foodways Texas, won a James Beard Award for The Jemima Code, her groundbreaking history of the role of Black Americans in the development of the cuisines of the American South. Building on that research—much of it drawn from her own collection of 300-plus African American cookbooks— Tipton-Martin’s new Jubilee (Clarkson Potter, $35) complements the story of the food with brief portraits of the cooks, tavern keepers, and others usually left out of conventional histories and a rich selection of 125 of the actual recipes—ranging from gumbos and peanut soup to Caribbean roast pork and, from 1866, "forced meat" aka ground steak—each updated and adapted for today’s kitchens. Much more than “soul food,” these dishes were created by skilled and imaginative Black cooks who drew on a wide range of cuisines—and in turn influenced later American cooking.

Jubilee: Recipes from Two Centuries of African American Cooking: A Cookbook Cover Image
$35.00
ISBN: 9781524761738
Availability: In Stock—Click for Locations
Published: Clarkson Potter - November 5th, 2019

Staff Pick

Barbara Natterson-Horowitz and Kathryn Bowers, an evolutionary biologist and science journalist, respectively, taught us a lot about animals, humans, and the diseases we share in their groundbreaking Zoobiquity. Again skirting the twin dangers of anthropomorphism—making animals too much like us—and anthopodenialism—missing the connections between us and animals—their new work looks at how both animals and humans experience adolescence. Shared by nearly all species, from insects and amphibians to birds and mammals, adolescence, or, as the authors term this pivotal developmental stage, Wildhood (Scribner, $28), is crucial to helping the young develop skill sets concerning safety, status, sexuality, and independence. Examining each life lesson in detail, the book tracks the experiences of a juvenile penguin leaving her Antarctic birthplace for the treacherous seas; a young male hyena, born at the low-end of his species’s totem pole; the complicated romantic history of a humpback whale; and a wolf who has to go off and survive on his own. Full of fascinating details about these four species and many others, these coming-of-age stories also bear profound similarities to those of their human counterparts. If teens seem maddeningly reckless, over-sensitive, and obsessed with status, this book shows that they are only behaving as evolution prepared them to.

Wildhood: The Astounding Connections between Human and Animal Adolescents Cover Image
$28.00
ISBN: 9781501164699
Availability: In Stock—Click for Locations
Published: Scribner - September 17th, 2019

Pages