Staff Pick

Wes Moore’s third book brings him back to Baltimore, where he spent part of his childhood and resides now, to explore the undercurrents of Freddie Gray’s death at the hands of police in April 2015. Moore, currently head of The Robin Hood Foundation, focuses on the five days from Gray’s arrest for allegedly possessing an illegal knife to his death in a coma in a local hospital. Gray’s case made national news and ushered in a period of reckoning for a city on edge. Through interviews with eight Baltimoreans directly affected by the news coverage and protests that followed Gray’s death, Moore details the roots of injustice that led to this cataclysmic moment for the city—and that may yet augur a glimmer of hope for the future.

Five Days: The Fiery Reckoning of an American City Cover Image
$28.00
ISBN: 9780525512363
Availability: In Stock—Click for Locations
Published: One World - June 23rd, 2020

Staff Pick

Ibram X. Kendi founded the Antiracist Research and Policy Center at American University, whose stated mission “is to convene and team up varied specialists to figure out novel and practical ways to understand, explain, and solve seemingly intractable problems of racial inequity and injustice.” Kendi’s new book, How to Be an Antiracist (One World, $27), is a continuation of both this project and his first book. While Stamped from the Beginning followed the lives of four historical individuals, Kendi here turns to autobiography to illustrate the unconscious pitfalls of racist thought, outlining a “how to” for gaining self-awareness of one’s own racist attitudes and thinking. Deploying history and political theory along with memoir, Kendi has devised a powerful tool for exploring the racism/antiracism dichotomy through multiple social dimensions, exposing the notion of a middle ground between them as an illusion. Whether you agree or disagree, Kendi’s ideas are bold and fresh, and sure to provoke discussion and self-reflection.

How to Be an Antiracist Cover Image
$27.00
ISBN: 9780525509288
Availability: In Stock—Click for Locations
Published: One World - August 13th, 2019

Staff Pick

Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, the NBA’s all-time leading scorer and a six-time champion, gracefully extended his personal spotlight to an international platform of social justice (as well as to literature: he’s written several history books, autobiographies, mysteries, children’s books, and graphic novels). Now he merges these passions and rallies for the win with Writings on the Wall: Searching for a New Equality beyond Black and White (Time Home, $27.95). Working with his frequent co-writer Raymond Obstfeld, Abdul-Jabbar deploys history and statistics to assess America’s current state of angst with regard to Islamophobia, media bias, rape culture, and the social plague of inequality reflected in housing, education, employment, sexism, and racial profiling. To keep these themes poignant, lyrical, and connected, the authors put them in a musical framework, drawing from songs as a source for chapter titles and segues; give a listen to Marvin Gaye’s “Makes Me Wanna Holler,” Imagine Dragons” “Radioactive,” and Stevie Wonder’s “Superstition.” The latter initiates the book with the haunting refrain: “...when you believe in things you don’t understand, then you suffer/superstition ain’t the way.” Through its elevating soundtrack and accessible discourse, Writings on the Wall offers and inspires solutions, encouraging fundamental change and renewing belief in the power of community.

Writings on the Wall: Searching for a New Equality Beyond Black and White Cover Image
ISBN: 9781618931719
Availability: Hard to Find
Published: Time Home Entertainment - August 23rd, 2016

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