Sarah Cameron - The Hungry Steppe: Famine, Violence, and the Making of Soviet Kazakhstan

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Sunday, January 6, 2019 - 5:00pm to 6:00pm

The three-year Kazakh famine that began in 1930 killed more than 1.5 million people—a quarter of Kazakhstan’s population. From that brutal genesis, the Kazakh Soviet Socialist Republic was born. Though a stable territory with clear boundaries and integral to the Soviet economy, the region was scarred by Stalin’s disastrous treatment and never quite functioned according to Moscow’s plans. Drawing on state and Communist Party documents as well as Russian and Kazakh oral histories, Cameron, assistant professor of history at the University of Maryland, traces the ramifications of the famine through Kazakhstan’s subsequent history, from the socio-economics of its environment and the new national identity it forged in the wake of the disaster to its declaration of independence in 1991, the last of the Soviet republics to claim its sovereignty.

 

5015 Connecticut Ave NW
Washington, DC 20008
Non Fiction
The Hungry Steppe: Famine, Violence, and the Making of Soviet Kazakhstan Cover Image
$49.95
ISBN: 9781501730436
Availability: In Stock—Click for Locations
Published: Cornell University Press - November 15th, 2018

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