WRITING

With
Aaron Hamburger is the author of the short story collection The View From Stalin’s Head (winner of the Rome Prize in Literature), the novel Faith for Beginners (a Lambda Literary Award nominee), and the novel Nirvana is Here. His writing has appeared in The New York Times, The Washington Post, The Chicago Tribune, Poets & Writers, Tin House, Subtropics, Details, O, the Oprah Magazine, Boulevard, and The Village Voice. He has received fellowships from the Edward F. Albee Foundation and the Civitella Ranieri Foundation in Umbria, Italy, as well as residencies from Yaddo and Djerassi. He has also taught writing at Columbia University, NYU, the Stonecoast MFA Program, and George Washington University.
As writers, we always have to write about people whose life experiences and backgrounds are different from our own. In this two-session workshop, we'll examine identity through as many lenses as possible: in terms of gender, race, class, sexual orientation, class, age, body type, gluten tolerance, nerdiness, and many more. We'll look at published work and do targeted writing exercises that will spark your creativity. Two Mondays: June 10 and 17, 6-8 p.m.
With

Randon Billings Noble is an essayist. Her collection Be with Me Always was published by the University of Nebraska Press in March 2019, and her lyric essay chapbook Devotional was published by Red Bird in 2017. Individual essays have been nominated for Pushcart Prizes, listed as notable in Best American Essays, and appeared in the Modern Love column of The New York Times, The Massachusetts Review, Brevity, Creative Nonfiction, and elsewhere. Currently she is the founding editor of After the Art, and an occasional freelance reviewer for The A.V. Club. You can read more of her work at www.randonbillingsnoble.com.

What does it mean to keep a journal? What is gained, kept, discovered? How is it different from other forms of writing? Virginia Woolf called hers a “capacious hold-all … loose knit and yet not slovenly.” Joyce Carol Oates thinks of hers as “a counterworld: one world to balance the other.” Emerson, who kept a diary for nearly sixty years, reminds us that “the unrecorded life is not worth examining.

In this class we will explore the many forms a journal can take through in-class writing and take-home exercises. We will also look at the ways in which your private writing can be revised into more public forms of creative nonfiction. No experience necessary! Four Sundays: June 16, 23, 30 (skip July 7) and July 14, 2-4 p.m. *SOLD OUT*

 

With

Joyce Winslow was OP ED/Commentary Editor of the nonprofit, nonpartisan RAND Corporation and currently writes, pitches and places OP EDs for such private clients as Ambassadors, CEOs, and a former U.S. Secretary of Defense with whom she wrote a book published by the Brookings Institution. She has written and placed some 70 OP EDs in the last few years in top-tier mainstream newspapers, including some she bylined.

Taught by an OP ED editor, you’ll learn the proper structure of an OP ED, how to persuasively make your point and knock down opposing arguments (politely); what editors look for and what red flags to avoid. You’ll learn where/how and who to contact, how to fit your views to the right newspaper, and the format in which to submit an OP ED. This class is being repeated due to popular demand.  One Saturday, July 13, 2 - 5 p.m.

With

Marita Golden is a veteran teacher of writing and an acclaimed award-winning author of seventeen works of fiction and nonfiction. As a teacher of writing she has served as a member of the faculties of the MFA Graduate Creative Writing Programs at George Mason University and Virginia Commonwealth University and in the MA Creative Writing Program at John Hopkins University. Her new novel is The Wide Circumference of Love.  She is the recipient of many awards including the Writers for Writers Award presented by Barnes & Noble and Poets and Writers and the Fiction Award for her novel After awarded by the Black Caucus of the American Library Association.

In this day-long seminar you will learn the required elements of a successful non-fiction book proposal. You will learn the elements of the query letter, a successful “pitch”, introduction and samples chapters. Each participant’s book idea/proposal will be discussed and evaluated. New date: Saturday, July 27, 10am-4pm

With

Caroline Bock’s debut short story collection, CARRY HER HOME, won the 2018 Fiction Award from the Washington Writers’ Publishing House. She is also the author of the young adult novels, LIE and Before My Eyes, from St. Martin’s Press. She is a 2018 recipient of an Artists & Scholar Award from the Montgomery County Arts & Humanities Council for her novel-in-progress. Educated at Syracuse University where she studied creative writing with Raymond Carver and Tobias Wolff, she also earned an MFA in Fiction from the City College of New York. Currently, she lectures in English at Marymount University. More at www.carolinebockauthor.com

Home evokes a multitude of conflicts, whether we have left home, or never left home, or work to make a home. We will explore in our own fiction and/or creative nonfiction combining setting and memory and the layered emotions connected to home. Intended for writers working at all levels—we will write together via prompts in the workshop and start out fast with flash fiction/creative nonfiction, and with at-home assignments, move toward a full-length story or essay. Three Thursdays: July 25, August 1, 8, 6-8 p.m.

With

Marita Golden is a veteran teacher of writing and an acclaimed award-winning author of seventeen works of fiction and nonfiction. As a teacher of writing she has served as a member of the faculties of the MFA Graduate Creative Writing Programs at George Mason University and Virginia Commonwealth University and in the MA Creative Writing Program at John Hopkins University. Her new novel is The Wide Circumference of Love.  She is the recipient of many awards including the Writers for Writers Award presented by Barnes & Noble and Poets and Writers and the Fiction Award for her novel After awarded by the Black Caucus of the American Library Association.

In this workshop we’ll explore the characteristics of unforgettable fictional characters. Through close reading of excerpts from novels and short stories, and lots of writing assignments and in-class writing we’ll create, confounding, conflicted, maddening characters, the kind that readers can’t look away from and that they never forget. You will learn how to create a character willing to “go there” “say that” and “break the rules.” Four Tuesdays: August 6, 13, 20, 27th from 6:30-8:30 pm

FICTION

With

Nicole Miller's prize-winning essays have appeared recently in New Letters and Arts & Letters magazines. Her fiction has been published twice in The Mays, edited by Jill Paton Walsh and Sebastian Faulks. She received an M.Phil. in Victorian Literature from Lincoln College, Oxford; a PhD in English at University College, London; and an MFA at Emerson College, Boston, where she held the Graduate Fellowship in Creative Writing. At The Oxford English Dictionary, she has served as a scholarly reader for British Dialects since 2002. She edits faculty manuscripts in Harvard’s English Department and teaches nineteenth and twentieth century British literature at Politics and Prose in Washington D.C.

Over the course of 6 weeks, we will be reading Middlemarch at a pace which allows for a cherishing of the descriptive language, and the construction of the novel as a work of art which deals with themes common to the Victorian novel and the historic era in which George Eliot lived. Six Tuesdays: May 14, 21, 28, June 4, 11, 18, from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. *SOLD OUT* To be added to the waitlist email classes@politics-prose.com

 

With

Tara Campbell (www.taracampbell.com) is a Kimbilio Fellow, a fiction editor at Barrelhouse, and an MFA candidate at American University. Prior publication credits include SmokeLong Quarterly, Masters Review, Jellyfish Review, Booth, and Strange Horizons. Her novel TreeVolution was published in 2016, followed in 2018 by her hybrid poetry/fiction collection Circe's Bicycle. Her third book, a short story collection called Midnight at the Organporium, will be released by Aqueduct Press in 2019.

Have you ever wondered what would happen if we could really change places with other races—George S. Schuyler and Nalo Hopkinson have some ideas to share. Developments in science and technology affect people of all genders, races, and nationalities, so we should all have a voice in exploring the changes we'll face. Join us to read diverse perspectives in science fiction, and to start writing your own worlds of the future.  Four Tuesdays: June 4, 11, 18, 25, 6:30-8:30 p.m.

 

With

Christopher Griffin studied literature at Trinity College and University College in Dublin and in US colleges. He taught humanities for 28 years at Strayer University, Irish literature at George Washington University for eight years, and classes on various topics (including Joyce’s fiction) at Politics and Prose for 25 years.  He was a study leader on 15 Smithsonian Journeys.

This course is an introduction to James Joyce’s Ulysses, which many consider the seminal novel of the 20th Century.  If Ulysses has been on your bucket list but you never got around to reading this great novel, this course will make it easier for you.  In our four sessions we will look at the overall structure of the novel and concentrate on the more accessible and humorous sections. Four consecutive Saturdays of June 1, 8, 15 (the day before Bloomsday), and 22, 2019, 2-4 p.m.

With

Nicole Miller's prize-winning essays have appeared recently in New Letters and Arts & Letters magazines. Her fiction has been published twice in The Mays, edited by Jill Paton Walsh and Sebastian Faulks. She received an M.Phil. in Victorian Literature from Lincoln College, Oxford; a PhD in English at University College, London; and an MFA at Emerson College, Boston, where she held the Graduate Fellowship in Creative Writing. At The Oxford English Dictionary, she has served as a scholarly reader for British Dialects since 2002. She edits faculty manuscripts in Harvard’s English Department and teaches nineteenth and twentieth century British literature at Politics and Prose in Washington D.C.

A compact but colorful story, written with the economy of poetry and the three-act structure of a contemporary play, while drawing its imposing contextual material from a history three times its size, Thomas Carlyle’s The French Revolution.  A book which Dickens claimed to have read 500 hundred times, The French Revolution— in its grand style and story-telling flourish, if not its subject matter— had been seared into his soul. Five Thursdays: May 30, June 6, 13, 20, 27 from 12:00 pm to 2:00 pm

With

Heba F. El-Shazli is an Egyptian-American and an avid lover and reader of literature from the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region. She is an assistant professor of political science at George Mason University’s Schar School of Policy and Government and an adjunct professor at Georgetown University’s Master’s Degree Program at the Center for Democracy and Civil Society. Heba teaches courses on governments and politics of the Middle East and North Africa, Islam and politics, international relations, and the role of civil society and social movements in democratization. She has a Ph.D. in Government and International Affairs from Virginia Tech’s School of Public and International Affairs and a Master’s degree from Georgetown University. She was the Director of MENA programs at the Solidarity Center (2004-2011) and the Deputy MENA Regional Director at the National Democratic Institute for International Affairs (NDI) from 2001 until 2004. She is a member of the Council on Foreign Relations (www.cfr.org)

This Spotlight class takes students journey into Ottoman Palestine and then British-mandate Nablus, Palestine 1914-1923 and Paris, France via The Parisian by Isabella Hammad in her debut novel. A historical novel which narrates the story of Midhat Kamal, a man caught between two cultures in a world on the verge of dramatic change in the beginning of the 20th century. Two Tuesdays: June 18 and 25, 3:30-5:30 p.m. *SOLD OUT* To be added to the waitlist email classes@politics-prose.com

With

Christopher Griffin studied literature at Trinity College and University College in Dublin and in US colleges. He taught humanities for 28 years at Strayer University, Irish literature at George Washington University for eight years, and classes on various topics (including Joyce’s fiction) at Politics and Prose for 25 years.  He was a study leader on 15 Smithsonian Journeys.

In the five chapters of A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, Joyce traces the slow growth of a soul in five stages and its many aspirations and disappointments. If you are ever going to read Ulysses in this lifetime, you might find it useful to first know Joyce’s easier prequel, Portrait of the Artist Four Fridays: June 7, 14, 21, 28, 2019, 6-8 pm

With
Aaron Hamburger is the author of the short story collection The View From Stalin’s Head (winner of the Rome Prize in Literature), the novel Faith for Beginners (a Lambda Literary Award nominee), and the forthcoming novel Nirvana is Here. His writing has appeared in The New York Times, The Washington Post, The Chicago Tribune, Poets & Writers, Tin House, Subtropics, Details, O, the Oprah Magazine, Boulevard, and The Village Voice. He has received fellowships from the Edward F. Albee Foundation and the Civitella Ranieri Foundation in Umbria, Italy, as well as residencies from Yaddo and Djerassi. He has also taught writing at Columbia University, NYU, the Stonecoast MFA Program, and George Washington University.

In his last three novels, Thomas Mallon, a well-known DC author of historical fiction and literary critic, has turned his sights on the recent past, including novels about Nixon (Watergate),Ronald Reagan (Finale), and now his latest book, about George W. Bush, Landfall.In this one-session meeting, we'll take a close look at this novel to consider the differences between fact and fiction, how the W. Bush administration looks in hindsight, as well as some of the thorny questions faced by authors of historical fiction. During this session, we'll be sharing insights from various authors of historical fiction who manage to breathe life into the past and bring it alive. Sunday, July 14, 2-4 p.m.

With

Tara Campbell (www.taracampbell.com) is a Kimbilio Fellow, a fiction editor at Barrelhouse, and an MFA candidate at American University. Prior publication credits include SmokeLong Quarterly, Masters Review, Jellyfish Review, Booth, and Strange Horizons. Her novel TreeVolution was published in 2016, followed in 2018 by her hybrid fiction/poetry collection Circe's Bicycle. Her third book, a short story collection called Midnight at the Organporium, will be released by Aqueduct Press in April 2019.

Marlon James’ new fantasy novel Black Leopard, Red Wolf (book one of a planned trilogy) is crossing genres to captivate the literary world with its mesmerizing blend of epic adventure and African mythology. Follow James' protagonist, Tracker the hunter, through his vivid, complex, and dangerous world in a facilitated discussion of the novel. Two Thursdays: July 11 and 18, 6-8 p.m.
With

Lori Brister has a Ph.D. in English literature and frequently writes about travel literature and visual culture. She has contributed to numerous scholarly publications and journals, and her nonfiction essays have appeared in Literary Hub, The Platform UK, South Atlantic Review, and forthcoming in the Los Angeles Review of Books. She is also the website manager and graphic designer at Politics and Prose.

For two weeks, we’ll be reading Elizabeth Gaskell’s 1854 novel North and South. We’ll discuss some of Gaskell’s broader themes, like industrialism and class struggles, while also closely reading one of the most important Realist novels of the nineteenth century. Two Thursdays: July 18 and 25, 2-4 p.m.

With

Carrie Callaghan’s debut novel, A Light of Her Own, about 17th century painter Judith Leyster, was published by Amberjack in 2018. Her next novel, Salt the Snow (Amberjack, 2019), is about trail-blazing but little-known early 20th century journalist Milly Bennett and her years in 1930s Moscow and Spain. Carrie’s short stories have been published in multiple literary journals around the country, and she is a senior editor with the Washington Independent Review of Books.

Amor Towles’s novel A Gentleman in Moscow ought to be a snooze: one man, stuck in one hotel, for thirty-two years. But as readers of this New York Times bestseller know, the novel is anything but. In this one-session class, we’ll explore why this novel about a Russian aristocrat caught in the Soviet maw is both compelling and relevant to 21st century readers.  Sunday, July 21, 2-4 p.m.

With

Leigha McReynolds received her PhD in English Literature from The George Washington University. Her dissertation was on science and the supernatural in 19th Century British Literature, but her current research focus is contemporary science fiction. She has published and presented on science fiction texts ranging from Ursula K. Le Guin’s short stories to Ernest Cline’s Ready Player One. Currently, Leigha is a professor in the writing program at The George Washington University where she uses science fiction to engage students across disciplines.

This class will provide a guided introduction to the varied work of Octavia Butler. We will read Kindred, Wild Seed, and Parable of the Sower to trace how Butler changed representation in science fiction. Three Mondays: July 8, 15, 22, 6:00 to 8:00 pm

With

Brittany Kerfoot holds a Bachelor of Arts and a Master in Fine Arts (Fiction) from George Mason University. Her writing has been published in The Doctor TJ Eckleburg Review, Driftwood Press, Madcap Review, Eventbrite.com, and others. She is an events manager at Politics and Prose, a college English professor at her alma mater, and at work on her first novel.

A boy falls in love with a 2,000-year-old girl's body. A mother makes a deal with the devil to save her child. A woman is possessed by the spirit of a Joshua tree. It's stories like these that transport readers of Karen Russell's Orange World to a whole new realm of being, a world she has created.
 
In this class, participants will discuss elements of style, theme, characterization, plot, and the genre of magical realism in Orange World and Other Stories by Karen Russell. Tuesday, July 30, 6-8 p.m.
With

Leigha McReynolds received her PhD in English Literature from The George Washington University. Her dissertation was on science and the supernatural in 19th Century British Literature, but her current research focus is contemporary science fiction. She has published and presented on science fiction texts ranging from Ursula K. Le Guin’s short stories to Ernest Cline’s Ready Player One. Currently, Leigha is a professor in the writing program at The George Washington University where she uses science fiction to engage students across disciplines.

In this class we will discuss Octavia Butler’s “hard” science fiction trilogy, known both as Xenogenesis and Lilith’s Brood. Our discussion of Butler’s post-apocalyptic earth that is saved by alien intervention will raise questions about race, what it means to be human, and possibilities for extraterrestrial relationships. Three Mondays: July 29, August 5, 12, 6:00 to 8:00 pm

With
Garrett Peck is an author, historian and tour guide in the DC area. His seventh and latest book is The Great War in America: World War I and Its Aftermath. He frequently leads tours through Politics & Prose, including the Jazz History Tour and Walt Whitman in Washington Tour, and recently taught a class on Willa Cather’s fiction. Garrett is currently working on a book about how Willa Cather composed Death Comes for the Archbishop
 

Willa Cather said that “the world broke in two in 1922 or thereabouts,” with the older Americans of the Progressive Era divided from the younger, more cynical Lost Generation that was disillusioned from the outcome of World War I. Although Ernest Hemingway first used the phrase “lost generation” in print, Scott Fitzgerald became their spokesman with his electric This Side of Paradise published in 1920 (he also gave the era its nickname: the Jazz Age).  Sinclair Lewis skewered American conformity in Babbitt (1922), which was written in Washington, D.C. And Dorothy Parker made her name writing pointed reviews and stories in the New Yorker. In this class, we’ll explore these four outstanding authors from the 1920s in a time of disillusionment and nonconformity. Four Tuesdays: August 6, 13, 20, 27, 2-4 p.m.

With

Carrie Callaghan’s debut novel, A Light of Her Own, about 17th century painter Judith Leyster, was published by Amberjack in 2018. Her next novel, Salt the Snow, is forthcoming from Amberjack in November 2019. Her short stories have been published in multiple literary journals around the country, and she is a senior editor with the Washington Independent Review of Books.

Historical novelists all bend the past to suit their narratives, but writers differ on their approach to the historical record. This class will consider novels ranging from narrowly factual to revisionist to blithely fantastical, and we will discuss the advantages and disadvantages of each form. Three Thursdays:  August 15, 22, 29, from 6- 8pm

With

Maria Frawley is a Professor of English at George Washington University, where she teaches courses in nineteenth-century literature and regularly offers seminars on Jane Austen. She has authored books and articles on nineteenth-century women writers, including Jane Austen, Anne Brontë, Charlotte Brontë, Elizabeth Gaskell, and Harriet Martineau. Co-editor of the forthcoming Companion to Jane Austen with Routledge University Press, she is also at work on a book titled Keywords of Jane Austen’s Fiction.

A modestly successful “lady novelist” in her time and global literary celebrity today, Jane Austen continues to inspire new readers from around the world with stories that move far beyond the “three or four families in a country village” that she famously declared to be her special purview. Our course will explore the fascinating ways that her fiction represents and responds to her time and situation as well as the continuing relevance of her writing to our lives today. Six Wednesdays: June 19, July 3, July 17, July 31, August 14, August 21, from 2:30 to 4:30 p.m.

With

Melanie (Penny) Du Bois did her undergraduate and graduate work at Harvard, has lived in Europe, and taught literature at universities there and here. She has directed a reading group in Washington since 1989, and last taught at Politics and Prose in 2018. Her recent classes have been on the work of Coetzee, Penelope Fitzgerald, Tolstoy.

No matter which Proust you want to know - the stylist, the subtle psychologist, the recorder of the moeurs of late nineteenth and early twentieth-century Paris, the ingenious contriver of narrative dislocation, the poet of subjective states and aesthetic insights -  you have to start somewhere.  We will read together the first volume of William Carter’s edition of the Scott Moncrieffe translation of In Search of Lost Time.  We will only begin to discover that the project of this great sprawling novel was not a fixed task, like a monument to be built brick by brick, but more like the anxious process we all know of self-realization: what do we remember? what did we feel? what do we want?  who were we? who were they?  what do we care for? where are we going? Six Mondays, August 12, 19, 26, September 9,16, 23, 1-3 p.m.

NONFICTION

With

Sandra Beasley is the author of three poetry collections, including Count the Waves (W.W. Norton), as well as the memoir Don’t Kill the Birthday Girl: Tales from an Allergic Life (Crown). Honors for her work include an NEA Literature Fellowship; distinguished writer residencies at Wichita State University, Cornell College, Lenoir-Rhyne University, and the University of Mississippi; and three D.C. Commission on the Arts and Humanities Artist Fellowships. She is on the faculty of the University of Tampa’s low-residency MFA program, and periodically teaches at The American University.  She is also the editor of Vinegar and Char: Verse from the Southern Foodways Alliance (University of Georgia Press).

In this Spotlight discussion, readers will approach this complex, capacious essay collection with instructor Sandra Beasley. Esmé Weijun Wang draws upon firsthand experience—of being diagnosed with PTSD, late-stage Lyme Disease, and schizoaffective disorder complicated by Cotard’s Delusion—while employing her skills as an accomplished novelist and a former scientific researcher at Stanford. Monday, June 24, from 7 to 9 p.m.

POETRY

With

Annie Finch is the author or editor of six books of poetry, most recently Spells: New and Selected Poems. Her poetry has been performed at Carnegie Hall and the Metropolitan Museum of Art, installed in the Cathedral of St. John the Divine, and published in Poetry, Paris Review, The New York Times, and The Penguin Book of Twentieth-Century American Poetry. Her books for poets and poetry lovers include A Poet's Craft: A Comprehensive Guide to Making and Sharing Your Poetry, Measure for Measure: An Anthology of Poetic Meters, An Exaltation of Forms: Contemporary Poets Celebrate the Diversity of Their Art, and The Body of Poetry. Finch holds a BA from Yale and a Ph.D from Stanford, has taught and lectured widely, and has received the Robert Fitzgerald Prosody Award for her lifetime contribution to the art and craft of versification.

 

Join acclaimed poet, editor, and translator and beloved poetry teacher Annie Finch for a reading and writing journey through the pleasures and challenges of the villanelle form. No previous poetry writing experience necessary. Three Thursdays, June 6, 13, (20 skip), 27 from 3:00 to 5:30 p.m.

With

Alexander Sens has been a professor at Georgetown University since he received his PhD in Classics in 1991, and currently occupies the Markos and Eleni Kounalakis Chair in Hellenic Studies. His research and teaching focus on Greek poetry, and in particular on that of the late Classical and early Hellenistic periods. He's especially interested in how poets of these ages engage with the antecedent literary tradition in order to create meaning. His most recent book, co-authored with his colleague Charles McNelis, is The Alexandra of Lycophron: A Literary Study (OUP, 2016)

 This course will focus on Homer's Odyssey, and in particularly on Emily Wilson's new translation of the poem.  It will proceed by a mixture of lecture and discussion, always with a focus on close reading, and will cover general questions of epic composition, including its construction of heroic values and its treatment of issues of gender and sexuality.  In addition, a class and a half will be devoted to Apollonius' Argonautica , a work composed in the period after Alexander the Great that engages closely the Odyssey and that was of crucial importance for later literature like Vergil's Aeneid.  Four Thursdays: June 6, 13, 20, 27, 6-8 p.m.

With

Rabbi Shira focuses on making Jewish meaning and building Jewish community for young professionals as Sixth & I’s senior rabbi. She graduated from the Reconstructionist Rabbinical College in 2007, where she was a Wexner Graduate Fellow. She is an alumna of Columbia University and the Charles E. Smith Jewish Day School.

Mary Oliver, one of the greatest poets of the 20th/21st century, passed away this past January. Her deeply spiritual work reminds us to live in awe and wonder always. She puts the exquisiteness of life into words and also leaves blank space for the ineffable. We can study her poetry through a Jewish lens. This class is in partnership with Sixth & I.  Monday, August 19, 6:30-8:00 pm. Class takes place in classroom at Politics and Prose Connecticut Ave location.

LIFESKILLS

With

Jerry Webster presently serves as the Shastri, or head teacher, with the Shambhala Buddhist Meditation Center in Washington, D.C. He began meditation with a ten full-day retreat in India with the Burmese teacher Goenka in 1974. Since 1976, he is a student of the Shambhala Buddhist tradi-tion and he has taught in this tradition since 1977. He obtained his PH.D. in Curriculum and Instruction from the University of Maryland in 1999. He has taught numerous courses in literature for the University of Maryland and Johns Hopkins University and numerous courses in multiculturalism for Montgomery County Public Schools. He has taught English full-time in public school systems for forty years; he be-gan teaching with the Peace Corps in Afghanistan in 1973. During the past four years, he has led five full-day week-long meditation weekthuns and numerous programs along the East Coast, including multi-ple local courses Johns Hopkins University, the U.S. Peace Corps, Frederick Community College, and the Frederick Meditation Center.

The practice of the four foundations of mindfulness allows one to enter the present more fully. This is a course on mindfulness which involves studying, contemplating, understanding, and em-ploying techniques, called the Four Foundations of Mindfulness, which Gotama Buddha used over 2,500 years ago. Four Wednesdays: June 5, 12, 19, and 26, 6:30 p.m. - 8:30 p.m. *SOLD OUT* To be added to the waitlist email classes@politics-prose.com

POLITICS & PLACE

With

Christopher Griffin studied literature at Trinity College and University College in Dublin and in US colleges. He taught humanities for 28 years at Strayer University, Irish literature at George Washington University for eight years, and classes on various topics at Politics and Prose for over 25 years.  He was a study leader on 15 Smithsonian Journeys.

This course will look at Irish life in the past century or so, as told in scores of voices, both famous and unknown.  Using texts from 1916 to the present in our anthology, Ireland: The Autobiography: One Hundred Years of Irish Life, Told by Its People, we will hear diverse voices tell their stories and eye-witness accounts of history. Four Fridays: June 7, 14, 21, 28, 2019, 3:30-5:30 pm. *SOLD OUT* To be added to the waitlist email classes@politics-prose.com

 

With

David B. Johnson is a professor of philosophy at Marymount University, and former writing professor at American and GW Universities.  He earned his PhD in Cultural Studies at George Mason University in 2011, and writes primarily about ethics and political theory.  He has two sons and 4 grandchildren, has been enjoying life with his girlfriend, E. Foster Pacine, and lives in Clifton VA.

This course pays close attention to Plato's work but also interrogates Bloom's translation in order to see what is what in The Republic. Four Thursdays: September 5, 12, 19, 26, 6:30-8:30pm

With

Joseph Hartman teaches political theory, constitutional law and American government in the Department of Government at Georgetown University. Prior to his time in the academy he spent more than a decade as a litigation attorney in private practice with a large law firm in Washington, D.C. He earned his Ph.D. in Government from Georgetown in 2015 (where he also served as the Interim Director of the Tocqueville Forum on the Roots of American Democracy). He holds a J.D. from the University of Chicago Law School (1999) and a B.A. in American Government from the University of Virginia (1996). His academic and intellectual interests focus on the relationship between political thought and theology in the Western tradition and contemporary issues relating to public and constitutional law.

Written by Founding-era luminaries James Madison, Alexander Hamilton and John Jay, The Federalist is considered by many to be the most significant work of American political thought. Taught by Professor Joseph Hartman, who teaches constitutional law and political theory at Georgetown University, this class will offer an overview of the historical and political context surrounding the Constitutional Convention and the Ratification debates before turning to a guided reading of this profound collection of essays explaining the logic of the American system. Four Wednesdays August 21, September 4, 18, October 2, 6:30-8:30 p.m.

HISTORY & BIOGRAPHY

With

Elisabeth Griffith

In 1920, the Nineteenth Amendment, enfranchising women as voters, passed by one vote, after a 70+ year long struggle.  There were three generations of leadership and continual conflicts follow by schisms over goals, tactics, priorities and racial inclusion.  It's remarkable that a fragile coalition of political feminists, social justice reformers, anti lynching activists and random radicals held together long enough to succeed.  One Saturday June 29, 1-3 p.m.

With

Brian Taylor is a scholar of US history who focuses on the Civil War era and is interested in issues of citizenship, race and national belonging. He earned his doctorate from Georgetown University in 2015, and since has taught at Georgetown and the University of Maryland, Baltimore County. His first book, tentatively titled Fighting for Citizenship, is in the production process at the University of North Carolina Press. His next project will focus on the Reno City neighborhood of Washington, DC, a community founded by enslaved men and women after the Civil War. He lives in Laurel, MD, with his wife Diane, son Steve, and three cats.

 

The man who won the war, the man who lost the peace.  So runs the conventional wisdom about Ulysses S. Grant: his skill as a general brought down the Confederacy, but his inadequacies as a president allowed the change wrought by the Civil War to be undone.  Ron Chernow’s Grant challenges this narrative, and in this class we will examine the Civil War era through an in-depth analysis of the life and legacy of one of its central figures. Six Wednesdays: July 10, 17, 24, 31, Aug 7, 14, 6-8 p.m.