Shadows of Nagasaki: Trauma, Religion, and Memory After the Atomic Bombing (World War II: The Global) (Paperback)

Shadows of Nagasaki: Trauma, Religion, and Memory After the Atomic Bombing (World War II: The Global) By Chad R. Diehl (Editor), Brian Burke-Gaffney (Contribution by), Chad R. Diehl (Contribution by) Cover Image

Shadows of Nagasaki: Trauma, Religion, and Memory After the Atomic Bombing (World War II: The Global) (Paperback)

By Chad R. Diehl (Editor), Brian Burke-Gaffney (Contribution by), Chad R. Diehl (Contribution by)

$35.00


Not On Our Shelves—Ships in 1-5 Days

A critical introduction to how the Nagasaki atomic bombing has been remembered, especially in contrast to that of Hiroshima.

In the decades following the atomic bombing of Nagasaki on August 9, 1945, the city's residents processed their trauma and formed narratives of the destruction and reconstruction in ways that reflected their regional history and social makeup. In doing so, they created a multi-layered urban identity as an atomic-bombed city that differed markedly from Hiroshima's image. Shadows of Nagasaki traces how Nagasaki's trauma, history, and memory of the bombing manifested through some of the city's many post-atomic memoryscapes, such as literature, religious discourse, art, historical landmarks, commemorative spaces, and architecture. In addition, the book pays particular attention to how the city's history of international culture, exemplified best perhaps by the region's Christian (especially Catholic) past, informed its response to the atomic trauma and shaped its postwar urban identity. Key historical actors in the volume's chapters include writers, Japanese- Catholic leaders, atomic-bombing survivors (known as hibakusha), municipal officials, American occupation personnel, peace activists, artists, and architects. The story of how these diverse groups of people processed and participated in the discourse surrounding the legacies of Nagasaki's bomb-ing shows how regional history, culture, and politics-rather than national ones-become the most influential factors shaping narratives of destruction and reconstruction after mass trauma. In turn, and especially in the case of urban destruction, new identities emerge and old ones are rekindled, not to serve national politics or social interests but to bolster narratives that reflect local circumstances.
Chad R. Diehl is an Instructional Designer at UVA and the author of Resurrecting Nagasaki: Reconstruction and the Formation of Atomic Narratives.
Product Details ISBN: 9781531504960
ISBN-10: 1531504965
Publisher: Fordham University Press
Publication Date: January 2nd, 2024
Pages: 368
Language: English
Series: World War II: The Global