Staff Pick

Evie L. Ewing uses poetry, prose, and artwork to write about black girlhood and black life in Chicago. She takes the difficulties of growing up as a black girl and makes them beautiful and poignant in this, her first collection of work. Writing odes to some of her favorite musical artists such as Prince and Erykah Badu, she shows the fullness of black life and the art that has influenced her. Those who love the poetry and prose of Claudia Rankine will also love this book.

Electric Arches Cover Image
$16.00
ISBN: 9781608468560
Availability: In Stock—Click for Locations
Published: Haymarket Books - September 12th, 2017

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Staff Pick

Kitano takes the title for her graceful, bittersweet poems from the English translation of the Korean word for “heaven,” a word also used by immigrants to mean the U.S. Though she set out to chronicle the history of her Korean grandmother’s immigration and her Japanese-American father’s internment during World War II, Kitano has only a handful of incomplete stories that, given her grandmother’s “metaphors// and my poor Korean commingle into myth.” Vivid and episodic, these myths sketch an ongoing experience of both love and loss, punctuated by the grandmother’s repeated  “you don’t know,” as if that is the elusive moral of her stories. Frustrated in her narrative effort, Kitano concentrates on moments of lyrical precision. With language that cuts through the fog of memory, she sees her father shot from “the slow drawn// bow” of the California coast to the camp in Utah; watches as a drowning woman’s “skirt blossoms around her lowering//head, a darkening halo”; and then, in America, searches for something genuine amid the lawn sprinklers “spitting fake rain” and the “Ferris wheel blinking in poor/approximations of stars.”

Sky Country Cover Image
$16.00
ISBN: 9781942683438
Availability: In Stock—Click for Locations
Published: BOA Editions - September 12th, 2017

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Staff Pick

Ten years ago at age eighty-four, the renowned poet and translator David Ferry embarked on an English version of Virgil’s Aeneid (Chicago, $35). Now complete, Ferry’s epic arrives already a major prize winner, as two excerpts from the then-work-in-progress appeared in Ferry’s Bewilderment: New Poems and Translations, winner of the 2012 National Book Award for poetry. Ferry, perhaps our foremost authority on Latin verse, delivers further proof that great literature can thrive in a second language on every page of this elegant, nuanced masterpiece. Vivid and flexible, Ferry’s English conveys the stateliness as well as the passion of Virgil’s original. The story, too, with its long wars and their many socio-economic consequences, remains immediate. The Aeneid follows a determined band of Trojan survivors from their ruined city to a promised land that will eventually become the Roman Empire. First, though, these stateless refugees, led by Aeneas, must endure a dystopian-novel’s worth of storms, betrayals, bad decisions, and supernatural wrath. If their ultimate fate, by definition, cannot be in doubt, the voyagers’ individual fortunes are never certain. Caught between the conflicting priorities of mortals and the capricious forces they call gods, the Trojans struggle to do the right thing. They suffer both justly and unjustly. They behave nobly. They cheat. In an apt metaphor for the inescapable PTSD of war, they enslave those they defeat. Have things changed so much since 19 BCE?

The Aeneid Cover Image
By Virgil, David Ferry (Translator)
$35.00
ISBN: 9780226450186
Availability: In Stock—Click for Locations
Published: University of Chicago Press - September 29th, 2017

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