LOSE YOURSELF IN FICTION

Explore the depth, range, and similarities of three Nobel Prize-winning authors through a reading and discussion of their work: Patrick Modiano’s Suspended Sentences, Alice Munro’s Runaway, and Toni Morrison’s Home. Six Mondays: January 11, 25, February, 8, 22, March 7, 14* (added date), 21, 1 – 3 p.m.

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Following the pioneering work of Fanny Burney in the 18th century, 19th-century England witnessed a quiet revolution: Women were writing and publishing novels. In this course, we will focus on five novels that offer a lens into the manners and the dramas of life and love in this period. Session 1: Tuesdays: Jan 12, Feb 16, Mar 15, Apr 12, May 10, 1 – 3 p.m.; Session 2: Wednesdays: Jan 13, Feb 17, Mar 16, Apr 13, May 11, 1 – 3 p.m.; Session 3: Thursdays: Jan 14, Feb 18, Mar 17, Apr 14, May 12, 1 – 3 p.m.

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Best known for his novel Invisible Man, Ellison also wrote strong short fiction, especially early in his career. These stories explored race, music, and American culture in ways the author would more fully realize in his acclaimed novel, Invisible Man. In discussions of these stories, participants will discover another aspect of this celebrated writer. Five Thursdays: February 25, March 10, 24, April 7, 21, 1 3 p.m.

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An in-depth discussion of Edith Wharton's brilliant and moving fiction, which explores marriage, divorce, money, class, and the overall situation of women of her era. This class will focus on four of her greatest novels, including The House of Mirth and The Age of Innocence. Four Mondays: January 18, February 1, 15, 29, 1 – 3 p.m. Sold out!

To be added to a wait list for the class, please email Justin at jstephani@politics-prose.com.

Delve into Hardy’s late-career triad that explores the relationship between character and an unforgiving cosmos. Beginning with the bad bargain of Michael Henchard in The Mayor of Casterbridge (1886), continuing with a twist in the bramble with Tess of the D’Urbervilles (1891), and culminating with the faulty towers of Jude the Obscure (1895), Hardy shows how a single error can reverberate through a lifetime. Seven Thursdays: January 21, 28, February 4, 18**, 25, March 3, 10, 1 – 3 p.m.

**(February 18th's meeting will take place from 3 – 5 p.m.)

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Explore Pulitzer Prize-winning novelist Marilynne Robinson’s lyrical body of work, whether you're a longtime admirer or a new reader discovering the pleasures of her writing for the first time. Four Tuesdays: February 9* (added date), 23, March 22, April 19, 1 – 3 p.m. Sold out!

To be added to a wait list for the class, please email Justin at jstephani@politics-prose.com.

Join us for a close read of last year’s Pultizer Prize-winning novel and a consideration of its delicate characterizations, braided storylines, unusual points-of-view, sweeping pace, meticulous prose, and sentimental notes, as we judge for ourselves what catapulted All the Light We Cannot See into literary glory. Thursday, March 24, 1 – 4 p.m.

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POETRY

This winter, we will read and discuss two contemporary poets whose works center on autobiography and memory, but who approach the interplay of these elements from different angles. Six Tuesdays: January 12, 19, 26, February 2, 16, 23, 3 – 4:30 p.m. Sold out! 

To be added to a wait list for the class, please email Justin at jstephani@politics-prose.com.

This consideration of Modern Irish Poetry will look at the work of Seamus Heaney as well as other Irish greats including Eavan Boland, Paul Muldoon, and Paula Meehan. Five Fridays: January 29, February 5, 12, 19, 26, 3 – 5 p.m. Sold out!

To be added to a wait list for the class, please email Justin at jstephani@politics-prose.com

Get your creative juices flowing, take chances with your work, and explore some of the many choices of form and language available to you as a poet. The result of this five day workshop will be five new poems for the New Year. New schedule: Monday, February 29 through Friday, March 4, 10 a.m. - noon

To be added to a wait list for the class, please email Justin at jstephani@politics-prose.com.

WRITING WORKSHOPS

Designed for writers of all levels, this course will cover unique, younger audiences, examine market trends, and practice the craft through writing exercises and workshopping. At Connecticut Avenue: Four Tuesdays: January 26, February 2, 9, 16, 23* (added date), 4:15 – 6:45 p.m.

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This class will help writers improve their editing skills by focusing on reviewing the content of pieces as a whole, as well as the fine-tuning of words, sentences, and paragraphs to improve flow and clarity. Four Mondays: February 1, 8, 15, 22, 1 – 3 p.m.

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This class will help you whether you’ve just started writing your memoir or are trying to finish the first draft, and will include feedback from both peers and the instructor. Four Tuesdays: February 2, 9, 16, 23, 10:30 a.m. – noon Sold out!

To be added to a wait list for the class, please email Justin at jstephani@politics-prose.com.

Writing about oneself inevitably impacts others. How do we morally, ethically, and legally portray other people in our memoirs? Tuesday, February 16, 1 – 3 p.m.

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The opening pages of any written work, fiction or nonfiction, are critical: Is the reader sufficiently hooked? This writing workshop focuses on the beginning of your manuscript and allows for feedback and discussion as you get started in the writing process. Five Mondays: April 4, 11, 18, 25, May 2, 1 – 3 p.m.

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POLITICS & PLACE

This course will discuss women’s legal treatment, introduce heroines like Belva Lockwood and “The Notorious RBG,” and address Supreme Court cases related to women and citizenship, employment, education, family law, and reproduction. Six Meetings: Wednesday, January 27, February 3* (added date); Friday, February 12; Wednesday, February 24; Wednesday, March 9; Wednesday, March 23; Wednesday, April 6; all from 1 – 3 p.m.

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This class will enjoy work about the capital city from classic and contemporary authors, ranging from Frederick Douglass and Willa Cather to Ward Just and Joan Didion. Five Fridays: January 29, February 5, 12, 19, 26, 6 – 8 p.m. Sold out!

To be added to a wait list for the class, please email Justin at jstephani@politics-prose.com.

Approaching this subject from multiple perspectives, this class will shed light on the complicated nature of Cuban-American relations as well as on Cuban history and culture through reading and discussion. Five Wednesdays: Feb 3, 10, 17, 24, March 2, 3 – 5 p.m.

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In an attempt to uncover the complex challenges of a turbulent 20th century, this class will read novels, short stores, and graphic novels depicting the country both before and after the 1979 revolution. Five Fridays: February 5, 19, March 4, 25, April 8, 1 – 3 p.m. Sold out!

To be added to a wait list for the class, please email Justin at jstephani@politics-prose.com.

Highlighting books and essays that range from the historical to the contemporary, with a dose of reading covering Paris’ food and culture, this class provides a rich overview of the City of Light. Four Mondays: February 15, 29, March 14, 28, 3 – 5 p.m.

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To kick off Women’s History Month, this class will focus on four major events that helped spark reform. Spanning the 1900s and beyond, discussions will include the Triangle Shirtwaist Factory fire in 1911 and the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Tuesday, March 1, 1 – 3 p.m.

MYSTERIES, CAPERS, AND THRILLERS

An examination of British Golden Age authors Agatha Christie, Josephine Tey, and Dorothy L. Sayers, considered through the lens of their evolving cultural environments that includes World Wars, suffragettes, the role of the “New Woman,” as well as shifts in faith. Five Fridays: March 4, 11, 18, 25, April 1, 12:45 – 2:45 p.m.

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