LOSE YOURSELF IN FICTION

Instructor:

Alicia Oltuski is the author of Precious Objects, a Barnes & Noble Discover Great New Writers selection. Her work has appeared on NPR's Berlin Stories, in W magazineand other publications. She holds an MFA in Creative Writing from Columbia University, where she received a David Berg Foundation Fellowship, and a BA and MA from the University of Pennsylvania.

The past few years have been a particularly exciting time for lovers of the short story, and in this class we’ll delve into the works of four twenty-first century masters of the form. Four Thursdays: July 28, August 4, 11, 18, 2 – 4 p.m. Sold out!

To be added to a wait list for the class, please email Justin at jstephani@politics-prose.com.

Instructor:

Melanie (Penny) Du Bois did her undergraduate and graduate work at Harvard, has lived in Europe, and taught literature at universities there and here. She has directed a reading group in Washington since 1989, and last taught at Politics & Prose in 2010, covering Chekhov’s stories and plays.

This close reading of The American, one of James' earlier works, will explore the author's sense of emerging transatlantic identity as well as his ideal of fiction. Four Wednesdays: August 3, 10, 17, 24, 2 – 4 p.m.

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Instructor:

Nicole Miller’s prize-winning essays have appeared recently in New Letters and Arts & Letters magazines. Her fiction has been published twice in The May Anthology of Short Stories, edited by Jill Paton Walsh and Sebastian Faulks. She received an M.Phil in Victorian Literature from Lincoln College, Oxford; a PhD in English at University College, London; and an MFA at Emerson College, Boston, where she held the Graduate Fellowship in Creative Writing. At The Oxford English Dictionary, she has served as a scholarly reader for British Dialects since 2002. She edits faculty manuscripts in Harvard’s English Department and teaches nineteenth and twentieth century British literature at Politics & Prose in Washington D.C.

She also leads fiction workshops at Grub Street in Boston, and is an emerging writer in residence at Kingston University, Kingston-upon-Thames, U.K.

Additional information about this instructor can be found at her website, www.inthesmallhours.com.

Dombey and Son is often considered Dickens' first heavyweight novel. Join us in an exploration of this story of urban London in the midst of midcentury boom and bust as we consider it in the context of the author's extensive body of work. Four Tuesdays: August 16, 23, 30, September 13, 1 – 3 p.m.

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POLITICS & PLACE

Instructor:

Elisabeth Griffith, PhD, loves to teach women’s history because it is full of gutsy women who fought to secure the equal rights we now take for granted. Her biography of Elizabeth Cady Stanton, In Her Own Right (Oxford), won accolades from the New York Times and the Wall Street Journal, and inspired Ken Burns’ documentary, “Not For Ourselves Alone.” Betsy served as Headmistress of The Madeira School from 1988-2010. She is working on a history of the Equal Rights Amendment.

An in-depth discussion and analysis of how women won the right to vote and what they have done with that right in the 96 years since women’s suffrage became the law of the land. Thursday, August 25, 1 – 3 p.m.

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Instructor:

Heba F. El-Shazli is an Egyptian-American and an avid lover and reader of literature from the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region. She is an assistant professor of political science at George Mason University’s School of Policy, Government and International Affairs (SPGIA) and an adjunct professor at Georgetown University’s Master’s Degree Program at the Center for Democracy and Civil Society. Heba teaches courses on governments and politics of the Middle East and North Africa, Islam and politics, and the role of civil society and social movements in democratization. She has a Ph.D. in Government and International Affairs from Virginia Tech’s School of Public and International Affairs and a Masters degree from Georgetown University. She was the Director of MENA programs at the Solidarity Center (2004-2011) and the Deputy MENA Regional Director at the National Democratic Institute for International Affairs (NDI) from 2001 until 2004. She is a member of the Council on Foreign Relations.

Join us on a literary journey to Turkey! In the next class in our series on the Middle East, we’ll explore the decline of the Ottoman Empire and rise of the Republic of Turkey through the eyes of five 20th-century Turkish authors. Five Fridays: August 26, September 9, 23, October 14, 28, 1 – 3 p.m. Sold out!

To be added to a wait list for the class, please email Justin at jstephani@politics-prose.com.

WRITING WORKSHOPS

Instructor:

Aaron Hamburger was awarded the Rome Prize by the American Academy of Arts and Letters for his short story collection The View From Stalin’s Head (Random House). His next book, a novel titled Faith for Beginners (Random House), was nominated for a Lambda Literary Award. His writing has appeared in The New York Times, The Washington Post, The Chicago Tribune, Poets & Writers, Tin House, Subtropics, Details, Michigan Quarterly Review, Boulevard, and The Village Voice. He has received fellowships from the Edward F. Albee Foundation and the Civitella Ranieri Foundation in Umbria, Italy, as well as residencies from Yaddo and Djerassi. He has also taught writing at Columbia University, NYU, the Stonecoast MFA Program, and George Washington University.

This two-session workshop will confront the challenges of writing violent, dangerous, intense, or climactic scenes in fiction and nonfiction. Two Mondays: August 1, 15, 6 – 8 p.m.

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Instructor:

John DeDakis is a former Senior Copy Editor on CNN's "The Situation Room with Wolf Blitzer" and the author of three novels, Fast Track, Bluff, and Troubled Water – all part of John’s Lark Chadwick mystery-suspense series. Bullet in the Chamber, the fourth novel in the Lark Chadwick series, will be released in October. This story deals, in part, with the death of John’s 22-year-old son Stephen in 2011. During John’s nearly 45-year award-winning career in journalism (25 years at CNN), he has been a White House correspondent and interviewed such luminaries as Alfred Hitchcock, Jimmy Carter, and Ronald Reagan. He has taught journalism at The University of Maryland – College Park and novel writing at The Writer’s Center in Bethesda.  In addition to leading writing workshops around the country and abroad, he edits book-length manuscripts. For more information, visit www.johndedakis.com.

A one-day, step-by-step workshop meant to deconstruct and demystify the novel-writing process for struggling and/or aspiring writers. Saturday, August 13, 9 a.m. – 4 p.m.

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