LOSE YOURSELF IN FICTION

With

Rhonda L. Shary was an adjunct professor of English in New York for over ten years, teaching writing and literature courses at Marymount College of Fordham University, New York Institute of Technology, and SUNY New Paltz, where she specialized in contemporary issues and literature, women’s writing and feminist theory, film studies, graphic novels, dystopian literature, and Native American literature. A published writer and poet, her work has appeared in several anthologies and journals, including P&P’s District Lines III, Water Writes: An Anthology in Honor of the Hudson River Quadricentennial, A Slant of Light: Women Writers of the Hudson River Valley, and The Shawangunk Review. After moving to D.C. in 2014, she joined the staff at Politics and Prose Bookstore, and is now an editor for OPUS Publishing and a teacher in the literature classes there.

This class will look at an author who enjoys enormous global popularity and influence for his two most famous works: The Satanic Verses, and the subject of this class and winner of the 1981 Booker Prize, Midnight’s Children. Four Thursdays: August 17, September 7, 21, 28, 1 to 3 p.m.

P&P is pleased to offer participants of this class a special discount to attend Salman Rushdie’s upcoming event at Sixth & I Synagogue on September 25 and receive a copy of his new novel, The Golden House. To receive your special discount code, please contact us at events@politics-prose.com with proof of your class purchase!

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Elaine Showalter is Professor Emerita of English and Avalon Professor of the Humanities at Princeton University. She has written ten books, from A Literature of Their Own: British Women Novelists from Bronte to Lessing (1977) which discussed the early works of Drabble and Byatt, to The Civil Wars of Julia Ward Howe (Simon & Schuster, 2016). Specializing in 19th and 20th century American and British literature, she has a longstanding interest in contemporary fiction, popular culture, and the arts, and has written about everything from fiction to fashion for newspapers, magazines, and journals in the U.S. and the U.K.

Dive into three of Philip Roth's early novels -- Goodbye, Columbus; Portnoy’s Complaint; and The Ghost Writer -- as Elaine Showalter leads a discussion of what made them successes upon their release, as well as why the themes and techniques he employed in these early novels continue to resonate today. Four Tuesdays: September 5, 12, 19, 26, 7 to 9 p.m.

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Helen Hooper, a fiction writer, was a Stegner Fellow at Stanford University. She has published stories in American Short Fiction, The Common, The Hopkins Review, Bellevue Literary Review and elsewhere. She was MacDowell Colony fellow, a Kenyon Review Peter Taylor fellow and holds an MFA from Warren Wilson College and a BA from Johns Hopkins. She has taught literature and creative writing at Stanford and other universities and at the middle and high school levels. She is now writing a novel.

Join this class and read three groundbreaking novels, each of which was scandalous in its time and each of which takes on the problem of the frustrated wife: Flaubert's Madame Bovary (1856), Tolstoy's Anna Karenina (1877), and Kate Chopin's The Awakening (1899). Three Sessions: September 14, October 12, November 20, 7 to 9 p.m. Currently being rescheduled for early 2018!

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With

Rhonda L. Shary was an adjunct professor of English in New York for over ten years, teaching writing and literature courses at Marymount College of Fordham University, New York Institute of Technology, and SUNY New Paltz, where she specialized in contemporary issues and literature, women’s writing and feminist theory, film studies, graphic novels, dystopian literature, and Native American literature. A published writer and poet, her work has appeared in several anthologies and journals, including P&P’s District Lines III, Water Writes: An Anthology in Honor of the Hudson River Quadricentennial, A Slant of Light: Women Writers of the Hudson River Valley, and The Shawangunk Review. After moving to D.C. in 2014, she joined the staff at Politics and Prose Bookstore, and is now an editor for OPUS Publishing and a teacher in the literature classes there.

Applying literary analysis through the prism of contemporary issues, this class aims to explore Margaret Atwood’s classic novel The Handmaid’s Tale, as well as new ideas of freedom and self-determination. Four Wednesdays: October 4, 11, 18, 25, 6:30 to 8:30 p.m.

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Nicole Miller’s prize-winning essays have appeared recently in New Letters and Arts & Letters magazines, and have been cited in Best American Essays, “Notable” (2016, ed. Jonathan Franzen). Her fiction has been published twice in The Mays, edited by Jill Paton Walsh and Sebastian Faulks. She received an M.Phil. in Victorian Literature from Lincoln College, Oxford; a PhD in English at University College, London; and an MFA at Emerson College, Boston, where she held the Graduate Fellowship in Creative Writing. At The Oxford English Dictionary, she has served as a scholarly reader for British Dialects since 2002. She edits faculty manuscripts in Harvard’s English Department and teaches nineteenth and twentieth century British literature at Politics & Prose in Washington D.C.

Explore this Dickens classic as well as the context through contemporary pieces on the lifestyle and culture of that time. Eight Thursdays: October 5, 12*, 19, 26, November 2, 9, 16, 30, 1 to 3 p.m.

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Christopher Griffin studied literature at Trinity College and University College in Dublin and in U.S. colleges. He taught humanities at Strayer for 28 years, Irish literature at George Washington University for eight years, and classes on various topics (including Joyce’s fiction) at Politics and Prose for 25 years. He was a study leader on 12 Smithsonian Journeys.

Ulysses, considered by many to be the seminal novel of the 20th century, tends to linger on bucket lists for years; this class will help readers tackle this daunting book by breaking down the structure and examining the most memorable moments. Five Fridays: October 6, 13, 20, 27, November 3, 3:15 to 5:15 p.m.

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With

Rhonda L. Shary was an adjunct professor of English in New York for over ten years, teaching writing and literature courses at Marymount College of Fordham University, New York Institute of Technology, and SUNY New Paltz, where she specialized in contemporary issues and literature, women’s writing and feminist theory, film studies, graphic novels, dystopian literature, and Native American literature. A published writer and poet, her work has appeared in several anthologies and journals, including P&P’s District Lines III, Water Writes: An Anthology in Honor of the Hudson River Quadricentennial, A Slant of Light: Women Writers of the Hudson River Valley, and The Shawangunk Review. After moving to D.C. in 2014, she joined the staff at Politics and Prose Bookstore, and is now an editor for OPUS Publishing and a teacher in the literature classes there.

Formal invention, complex political themes and histories, vivid characters, and lyrical language; twenty years after her first novel won the Booker Prize, Arundhati Roy’s second novel, The Ministry of Utmost Happiness, is now also out, nominated again, and up for discussion. Monday, October 9, 6:30 to 8:30 p.m.

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With

Virginia Newmyer has lectured frequently for the Smithsonian Institution in Washington and in Great Britain on a wide variety of topics in British history and literature. She also teaches OLLI courses at American University, as well as at Florida Atlantic University in Boca Raton and Jupiter.

Dr. Susan Willens, emerita professor of English at George Washington University, also teaches at the Smithsonian Resident Associates Program, the Osher Lifelong Learning Institute, and other literature classes.

For more than 10 years, Virginia and Susan have been holding classes at Politics & Prose that examine the threads that join British fiction and history.

Join Virginia Newmyer and Susan Willens for an in-depth discussion of the Man Booker Prize-winning novel Moon Tiger, by Penelope Lively. Session 1: Tuesday, October 10, 1 to 3 p.m.; Session 2: Wednesday, October 11, 1 to 3 p.m.; Session 3: Thursday, October 12, 1 to 3 p.m.

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With

Rhonda L. Shary was an adjunct professor of English in New York for over ten years, teaching writing and literature courses at Marymount College of Fordham University, New York Institute of Technology, and SUNY New Paltz, where she specialized in contemporary issues and literature, women’s writing and feminist theory, film studies, graphic novels, dystopian literature, and Native American literature. A published writer and poet, her work has appeared in several anthologies and journals, including P&P’s District Lines III, Water Writes: An Anthology in Honor of the Hudson River Quadricentennial, A Slant of Light: Women Writers of the Hudson River Valley, and The Shawangunk Review. After moving to D.C. in 2014, she joined the staff at Politics and Prose Bookstore, and is now an editor for OPUS Publishing and a teacher in the literature classes there.

Examine the artful use of narrative devices in literary detective novels in this new class covering two contemporary classics of crime fiction. Four Wednesdays: November 1, 8, 15, 22, 6:30 to 8:30 p.m.

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With

Melanie (Penny) Du Bois did her undergraduate and graduate work at Harvard, has lived in Europe, and taught literature at universities there and here. She has directed a reading group in Washington since 1989, and taught at Politics and Prose throughout 2016 and 2017, covering subjects including Henry James, Leo Tolstoy, and Vasily Grossman.

Fitzgerald’s rigorous, bleak, and lively style, and her structure, full of the incongruous and unexpected, make us rethink every assumption about what a novel is for and what it may be ‘about.’ Four Wednesdays: November 8, 15, 29, December 6, 1 to 3 p.m.

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With

James Grady is best known for his first novel that became the Robert Redford movie “Three Days of the Condor.” Nominated for an Edgar Award by the Mystery Writers of America, and awarded the Grand Prix Du Roman Noir and Italy’s Raymond Chandler Medal, Grady is a prolific writer with at least a dozen novels and twice that number of short stories. He's taught numerous classes for Politics & Prose on such topics as Dashiell Hammett, Raymond Chandler, James Cain, John LeCarre, noir, private eye and spy novels.

Novellas are a brave form for any writer; these four have enjoyed a huge impact on U.S. culture, in large part because of successful film adaptations of each. Session 1: Monday, November 13, 1 to 3 p.m.; Session 2: Tuesday, November 14, 7 to 9 p.m.

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POLITICS & PLACE

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Heba F. El-Shazli is an Egyptian-American and an avid lover and reader of literature from the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region. She is an assistant professor of political science at George Mason University’s Schar School of Policy and Government and an adjunct professor at Georgetown University’s Master’s Degree Program at the Center for Democracy and Civil Society. Heba teaches courses on governments and politics of the Middle East and North Africa, Islam and politics, and the role of civil society and social movements in democratization. She has a Ph.D. in Government and International Affairs from Virginia Tech’s School of Public and International Affairs and a Master’s degree from Georgetown University. She was the Director of MENA programs at the Solidarity Center (2004-2011) and the Deputy MENA Regional Director at the National Democratic Institute for International Affairs (NDI) from 2001 until 2004. She is a member of the Council on Foreign Relations.

This class will continue its exploration of Middle Eastern literature and politics by reading several works of Naguib Mahfouz (1911–2006), who is the only Arab writer to have been awarded the Nobel Prize for literature. Five Fridays: September 1, 15, October 6*, 20, November 3, 1 to 3 p.m.

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Supriya Goswami has taught courses in children’s literature, Anglophone world literature, and nineteenth-century British literature and Empire at California State University, Sacramento (2002-2007), and, more recently, at George Washington University. She is the author of Colonial India in Children’s Literature (Routledge, 2012), which is the first book-length study to explore the intersections of British, Anglo-Indian, and Bengali children’s literature and defining historical moments in colonial India. She is currently working on her second book, Colonial Wars in Children’s Literature. She has also published in the Children’s Literature Association Quarterly and Wasafiri.

This class will explore a diverse set of children’s books, past and present, in an attempt to understand the ways in which children’s stories both shape and are shaped by political, historical, and cultural forces. Four Tuesdays: September 19, 26, October 3, 10, 11 a.m. to 1 p.m.

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With

Joyce Winslow was Commentary Editor of the nonprofit, nonpartisan RAND Corporation. She has written, pitched and placed more than 60 opinion pieces in mainstream media in the last two years. An accomplished fiction writer and journalist, this is her sixth course for Politics and Prose.

Learn how to write 750 words essays and op-eds that clearly delineate a theme, advance your ideas or arguments, foresee and respond to conflicting views, and close with a call to action. Four Thursdays: September 28, October 5, 12, 19, 7 to 9 p.m.

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With

Aaron Hamburger was awarded the Rome Prize by the American Academy of Arts and Letters for his short story collection The View from Stalin’s Head (Random House). His next book, a novel titled Faith for Beginners (Random House), was nominated for a Lambda Literary Award. His writing has appeared in The New York Times, The Washington Post, The Chicago Tribune, Poets & Writers, Tin House, Subtropics, Details, Michigan Quarterly Review, Boulevard, and The Village Voice. He has received fellowships from the Edward F. Albee Foundation and the Civitella Ranieri Foundation in Umbria, Italy, as well as residencies from Yaddo and Djerassi. He has also taught writing at Columbia University, NYU, the Stonecoast MFA Program, and George Washington University.

In this course, writers of any level or experience will learn to use their fiction, non-fiction, or poetry to respond, either publicly or privately, to current events. Three Tuesdays: October 10, 17, 24, 6 to 8 p.m.

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THE WRITING LIFE

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Claire Handscombe is a British writer who moved to the U.S. in 2012, ostensibly to purse an MFA in Creative Writing, but really, let's be honest, because of a West Wing obsession. Her work has appeared in a wide range of publications, including Bustle, the Washingtonian, Washington Life, and the Washington Post.

This discussion-based class looks at linguistic and cultural differences between Americans and the British through books like Bill Bryson's Notes from a Small Island and Kate Fox's Watching the English. Tuesday, November 14, 3 to 4:30 p.m.

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With

John DeDakis is a former Senior Copy Editor on CNN's "The Situation Room with Wolf Blitzer" and the author of four novels, Fast Track, Bluff, Troubled Water, and Bullet in the Chamber – all part of the Lark Chadwick mystery-suspense series. Bullet in the Chamber deals, in part, with the death of John’s 22-year-old son Stephen in 2011. Bullet in the Chamber is the winner of the Reviewers Choice, Foreward INDIES, and Feathered Quill book awards for 2017. During John’s nearly 45-year award-winning career in journalism (25 years at CNN), he has been a White House correspondent and interviewed such luminaries as Alfred Hitchcock, Jimmy Carter, and Ronald Reagan. He has taught journalism at The University of Maryland – College Park and novel-writing at The Writer’s Center in Bethesda. In addition to leading writing workshops around the country and abroad, he edits book-length manuscripts. For more information, visit www.johndedakis.com.

A one-session primer that will help demystify the novel-writing process, examining each step along the way—from generating ideas, writing them down, publishing, and finally, finding readers. Wednesday, October 25, 10:30 to 12:30 p.m.

With

John DeDakis is a former Senior Copy Editor on CNN's "The Situation Room with Wolf Blitzer" and the author of four novels, Fast Track, Bluff, Troubled Water, and Bullet in the Chamber – all part of the Lark Chadwick mystery-suspense series. Bullet in the Chamber deals, in part, with the death of John’s 22-year-old son Stephen in 2011. Bullet in the Chamber is the winner of the Reviewers Choice, Foreward INDIES, and Feathered Quill book awards for 2017. During John’s nearly 45-year award-winning career in journalism (25 years at CNN), he has been a White House correspondent and interviewed such luminaries as Alfred Hitchcock, Jimmy Carter, and Ronald Reagan. He has taught journalism at The University of Maryland – College Park and novel-writing at The Writer’s Center in Bethesda. In addition to leading writing workshops around the country and abroad, he edits book-length manuscripts. For more information, visit www.johndedakis.com.

A one-day, step-by-step workshop meant to deconstruct and demystify the novel-writing process for struggling and/or aspiring writers. Saturday, October 28, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

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With

Alicia Oltuski has been published in Tin House, Narrative Magazine, Catapult, W magazine and NPR’s Berlin Stories. She holds an MFA from Columbia University, where she received a David Berg Foundation Fellowship, and a B.A. and M.A. from the University of Pennsylvania.

In this intensive three-hour course, students will create their own works of micro fiction, starting with in-class prompts and ending with constructive criticism for those who choose to share their work. Monday, October 30, 1:30 to 4:30 p.m.

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WRITING WORKSHOPS

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Leslie Pietrzyk is the author of two novels, Pears on a Willow Tree and A Year and a Day. This Angel on My Chest, her collection of linked short stories, won the 2015 Drue Heinz Literature Prize and was named by Kirkus Reviews as one of the best short story collections of 2015. Her short fiction and essays have appeared or are forthcoming in many publications, including The Washington Post Magazine, Salon, Southern Review, The Hudson Review, Gettysburg Review, The Sun, Shenandoah, Washingtonian, and Cincinnati Review. She has received fellowships from the Bread Loaf Writers’ Conference and the Sewanee Writers’ Conference. Pietrzyk is a member of the core fiction faculty at the Converse low-residency MFA program and teaches in the MA Program in Writing at Johns Hopkins University. She lives in Alexandria, Virginia. For more information: www.lesliepietrzyk.com.

Explore your creative side with this session of guided writing exercises focused on our observations and perceptions of daily life. No experience necessary! Wednesday, September 27, 6:30 to 9:00 p.m.

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With

Leslie Pietrzyk is the author of two novels, Pears on a Willow Tree and A Year and a Day. This Angel on My Chest, her collection of linked short stories, won the 2015 Drue Heinz Literature Prize and was named by Kirkus Reviews as one of the best short story collections of 2015. Her short fiction and essays have appeared or are forthcoming in many publications, including The Washington Post Magazine, Salon, Southern Review, The Hudson Review, Gettysburg Review, The Sun, Shenandoah, Washingtonian, and Cincinnati Review. She has received fellowships from the Bread Loaf Writers’ Conference and the Sewanee Writers’ Conference. Pietrzyk is a member of the core fiction faculty at the Converse low-residency MFA program and teaches in the MA Program in Writing at Johns Hopkins University. She lives in Alexandria, Virginia. For more information: www.lesliepietrzyk.com.

Who will tell the story? And how? Writers of all levels of experience are welcome to this investigation of perspective and the different ways it shapes stories. Monday, September 25, 1 to 4 p.m.

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With

Nicole Miller’s prize-winning essays have appeared recently in New Letters and Arts & Letters magazines. Her fiction has been published twice in The Mays, edited by Jill Paton Walsh and Sebastian Faulks. She received an M.Phil. in Victorian Literature from Lincoln College, Oxford; a PhD in English at University College, London; and an MFA at Emerson College, Boston, where she held the Graduate Fellowship in Creative Writing. At The Oxford English Dictionary, she has served as a scholarly reader for British Dialects since 2002. She edits faculty manuscripts in Harvard’s English Department and teaches nineteenth and twentieth century British literature at Politics & Prose in Washington D.C.

This one-day workshop will introduce writers to a number of Woolf’s lyrical shorter works, and use her experiments in point-of-view, time, consciousness, and character to embolden participants in their own explorations of form. Two Tuesdays: October 10, 17, 6:30 to 9 p.m.

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With

Jennifer Close is the best-selling author of Girls in White Dresses, The Smart One, and The Hopefuls. Born and raised on the North Shore of Chicago, she is a graduate of Boston College and received her MFA in Fiction Writing from the New School in 2005. She worked in New York in magazines for many years, and now, she lives in Washington D.C. and teaches at George Washington University.

This fiction workshop will jumpstart the creative process for new writers, and focus the skills of more experienced writers looking to improve. Five Wednesdays: October 18, 25, November 1, 8, 15, 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. Sold out!

To be placed on a wait list for this class, please email classes@politics-prose.com.

With

Jennifer Close is the best-selling author of Girls in White Dresses, The Smart One and The Hopefuls. Born and raised on the North Shore of Chicago, she is a graduate of Boston College and received her MFA in Fiction Writing from the New School in 2005. She worked in New York in magazines for many years and now lives in Washington DC and teaches at George Washington University.

Katherine Heiny is the author of Single, Carefree, Mellow and Standard Deviation. Her fiction has been published in The New Yorker, Ploughshares, Narrative, Glimmer Train, and many other places. She lives in Washington, D.C., with her husband and children.

What makes it work? What makes a “funny” piece flop? Join this class to conduct close readings of published pieces and workshop each other's humorous essays with the ultimate goal of publication in mind. Four Thursdays: October 19, 26, November 2, 9, 6 to 8 p.m. Sold out!

To be placed on a wait list for this class, please email classes@politics-prose.com.

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With

Marita Golden is a veteran teacher of writing and an acclaimed award-winning author of over a dozen works of fiction and nonfiction, many of which are taught in college and universities around the country. As a teacher of writing she has served as a member of the faculties of the MFA Graduate Creative Writing Programs at George Mason University, Virginia Commonwealth University, the Fairfield University low-residency MFA program, and as Distinguished Writer in Residence in the MA Creative Writing Program at Johns Hopkins University. She co-founded and serves as President Emeritus of the Hurston/Wright Foundation.

Marita’s recent novel, The Wide Circumference of Love, was published in the spring of 2017. Among her previous books are the novels After and The Edge of Heaven, and the memoirs Migrations of the Heart, Saving Our Sons, and Don’t Play in the Sun: One Woman’s Journey Through the Color Complex. She compiled the collection of interviews THE WORD: Black Writers Talk About the Transformative Power of Reading and Writing. Her most recentnonfiction is Living Out Loud a Writer’s Journey. She is the recipient of many awards including the Writers for Writers Award presented by Barnes & Noble and Poets and Writers, and the Fiction Award for her novel After, awarded by the Black Caucus of the American Library Association.

Review and discuss the opening chapters of classic works, as well as the works of class members, in an attempt to hone in on what effectively hooks readers. Saturday, November 4, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.

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With

Lori Steel is a freelance editor and school librarian. She has an MFA in Writing for Children and Young Adults from the Vermont College of Fine Arts and has worked for two children’s literary agencies. Lori reads and writes all kinds of fiction from her home in Kensington.

In this workshop-based class, students will generate creative ideas, hone craft, read critically and receive constructive feedback on their MG/YA fiction writing. Four Mondays: November 6, 13, 20, 27, 6:30 to 8:30 p.m.

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With

Aaron Hamburger was awarded the Rome Prize by the American Academy of Arts and Letters for his short story collection The View from Stalin’s Head (Random House). His next book, a novel titled Faith for Beginners (Random House), was nominated for a Lambda Literary Award. His writing has appeared in The New York Times, The Washington Post, The Chicago Tribune, Poets & Writers, Tin House, Subtropics, Details, Michigan Quarterly Review, Boulevard, and The Village Voice. He has received fellowships from the Edward F. Albee Foundation and the Civitella Ranieri Foundation in Umbria, Italy, as well as residencies from Yaddo and Djerassi. He has also taught writing at Columbia University, NYU, the Stonecoast MFA Program, and George Washington University.

Stop by the Den to try some tasty holiday dishes as part of this two-session writing workshop, aimed at enlivening your food writing. Two Tuesdays: November 21, 28, 7 to 9 p.m.

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MEMOIR

With

Joyce Winslow was Travel Editor of Redbook and Mademoiselle and has published hundreds of travel articles and essays. This is her sixth course for Politics and Prose.

Uncover the craft of travel writing by learning how to structure your stories, organize your insights, and write evocatively using fiction techniques to tell your story. Four Wednesdays: September 27, October 4, 11, 18, 7 to 9 p.m.  Sold out! 

To be placed on a wait list for this class, please email classes@politics-prose.com.

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POETRY

With

Shaheen Qureshi is a writer, editor, and literary agent. As the former managing editor of Tadween Publishing, a Middle East academic press, she facilitated the publication of a political cartoon book and a collection of interviews with Iraqi activists. Currently she is a literary agent at Capital Talent Agency where she is actively seeking literary fiction and narrative nonfiction that give voice to the underrepresented and/or marginalized. She received her B.A. in written arts at Bard College and has published poems in Bard Papers and Sukoon Magazine.

At a time when race and identity politics are front and center on the national and political stage, this writing workshop aims to explore and experiment with issues of identity, race, and heritage in poetic form. Five Mondays: October 2, 9*, 16, 23, 30, 6:30 to 8:30 p.m.

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With

Christopher Griffin is from the “real Yeats country” in south Galway near Yeats’ Thoor Ballylee. His grandfather, Christy Griffin, sometimes decorated Coole House and brought Lady Gregory news of “the Troubles” 1919-23, so, like Yeats, he is quoted in her journals.  Christopher studied Irish literature in English at Trinity College and University College in Dublin, and presented a paper at the Yeats Summer School in Sligo. He has taught courses in Irish literature at George Washington University for eight years and at Politics and Prose for 25 years. He was a study leader on 12 Smithsonian Journeys.

Dabble in the Nobel Laureate's poetry, plays, and prose with resident Yeats expert: Christopher Griffin. Five Fridays: October 6, 13, 20, 27, November 3, 6 to 8 p.m.

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With

Fleda Brown is the author of The Woods Are On Fire: New and Selected Poems, which was selected by Ted Kooser for his Contemporary Poetry Series from the University of Nebraska Press. The author of ten books of poetry and two essay collections, Fleda Brown was the Poet Laureate of Delaware from 2001 to 2007. She taught at the University of Delaware, where she founded the Poets in the Schools Program, and now teaches in The Rainier Writing Workshop, Pacific Lutheran University's Low Residency MFA Program. She writes about and reviews poetry for her local newspaper, the Traverse City Record-Eagle, and is regularly featured on Interlochen Public Radio. Her fourth nonfiction collection, My Wobbly Bicycle: Meditations on Cancer and the Creative Life (2016), benefits the Cowell Family Cancer Center’s Health and Wellness Suite in Traverse City.

In an attempt to tackle a variety of barriers to productivity and creativity, this class will alternate between awareness practice in the form of Buddhist meditation, and looking closely at, as well as writing, poems that have the potential to help one move beyond rigidity. Saturday, October 7, 3 to 5 p.m.

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With

Gigi Bradford is chair of the Folger Shakespeare Library Poetry Board and former Literature Director of the National Endowment for the Arts. She has been teaching the poetry circle at Politics & Prose for 12 years.

In our present national climate of “fake news” and “alternative facts,” can poetry inform discourse? If there is no such thing as “objective truth,” can we rely on the “subjective truth” of poetry? Delve into five fraught centuries of English and American history by examining the expressive poems of those who witnessed history’s extremities. Six Tuesdays: October 10, 17, 24, 31, November 7, 14, 3 to 4:30 p.m.

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THE WRITING LIFE, FUN FOR KIDS & TEENS

With

Sara Burnett is a writer, educator and consultant. Her poems have appeared in Barrow Street, Poet Lore, The Cortland Review, PALABRA, and elsewhere. She holds a MFA in poetry from the University of Maryland and a MA in English Literature from the University of Vermont. She is working on a full-length collection of poems as well as a chapbook, and has received scholarships from the Bread Loaf Writers’ Conference to support her writing. A former public high school teacher, she also writes on education equity and designs curriculum. She lives in Silver Spring, MD.

Explore and celebrate the creative self-expression of writing in a one day class designed to empower the voices of young women. Saturday, November 11, 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.

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