Donald Trump’s political ascendancy has generated a number of books by a range of authors—journalists, commentators, even comic-strip creators—all seeking to explain, in one way or another, the rise of this most unusual of U.S. presidential candidates. Here are some of our recent favorites:

Mark Singer, a longtime staff writer with The New Yorker, has a handwritten note from Trump calling him “a total loser.” Singer counts this among his proudest possessions. He profiled Trump 19 years ago in a piece that still stands as one of the most insightful portraits written about the man. In Trump and Me, Singer repackages the article with more recent material. He spoke at Politics & Prose in early July, in conversation with fellow magazine staff writer Jane Mayer. A video of the event can be seen here.

David Cay Johnston, a Pulitzer-winning investigative journalist, has put together an in-depth account of the mogul’s life in The Making of Donald Trump. Drawing on decades of interviews, financial records, court documents, and public statements, Johnston, who has covered Trump for years, recounts The Donald’s successes, troubles, and controversies. Johnston appears at P&P on August 25 at 7 p.m.

Another extensively researched biography also has just been produced by a team of Washington Post reporters, editors, and researchers, led by investigative political reporter Michal Kranish and senior editor Marc Fisher. Trump Revealed: An American Journey of Ambition, Ego, Money, and Power delves into many aspects of Trump’s life. Kranish and Fisher are scheduled for an event at Politics & Prose on November 5 at 6 p.m., just a few days before the presidential vote.

As a bombastic, larger-than-life figure, Trump in many ways has been a gift to humorists. Yet few can claim to have spotted his comedic potential earlier than Doonesbury comic-strip creator Garry Trudeau, who started lampooning Trump in 1987. Trudeau’s new book, Yuge!, collects 30 years of subsequent coverage. The celebrated cartoonist will be signing copies of his book at Politics & Prose on August 29 at 4 p.m.

As for the campaign itself, we’ll be reviving a P&P tradition of holding a viewing in the store of the televised presidential debates, starting with the first debate on September 26 at 9 p.m. Please come join us.

— Brad and Lissa

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